A Study in School Supervision: With Special Reference to Rural School Conditions in Texas

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University of Texas, 1894 - Rural schools - 180 pages
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Page 6 - This great increase of the quantity of work which, in consequence of the division of labour, the same number of people are capable of performing, is owing to three different circumstances; first, to the increase of dexterity in every particular workman; secondly, to the saving of the time which is commonly lost in passing from one species of work to another ; and lastly, to the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labour, and enable one man to do the work of many.
Page 2 - The benefits of education and of useful knowledge, generally diffused through a community, are essential to the preservation of a free government. Sam Houston Cultivated mind is the guardian genius of democracy. ... It is the only dictator that freemen acknowledge and the only security that freemen desire.
Page 6 - And if so, we must infer that all things are produced more plentifully and easily and of a better quality when one man does one thing which is natural to him and does it at the right time, and leaves other things.
Page 5 - Then, as we have many wants, and many persons are needed to supply them, one takes a helper for one purpose and another for another; and when these partners and helpers are gathered together in one habitation the body of inhabitants is termed a State. True, he said. And they exchange with one another, and one gives, and another receives, under the idea that the exchange will be for their good.
Page 11 - In studying the records of Massachusetts one is impressed by the fact that every new movement in education has run the gauntlet of fierce and bitter opposition before adoption. The ability of the conservative party has always been conspicuous, and the friends of the new measure have been forced to exert all their strength, and to eliminate one after another the objectionable features discovered in advance by their enemies. To this fact is due the success of so many of the reforms and improvements...
Page 179 - ... is today regarded as an essential factor in our school system. It has been observed that the schools that are closely supervised by men who thoroughly know their business at once respond to the influence of this supervision. Expert supervision has resulted in systematic, orderly, and well-directed instruction. It is a matter of remark that the most competent superintendents have the best schools, and that cities noted for their excellence in school work have attained this pre-eminence through...
Page 5 - Observe the accommodation of the most common artificer or day-labourer in a civilized and thriving country, and you will perceive that the number of people, of whose industry a part, though but a small part, has been employed in procuring him this accommodation, exceeds all computation. The woollen coat, for example, which covers the day-labourer, as coarse and rough as it may appear, is the produce of the joint labour of a great multitude of workmen.
Page 32 - ... superintendents, giving advice as to the best manner of conducting schools, constructing schoolhouses, furnishing the same, examining and procuring competent teachers.
Page 180 - ... interests of the country. We should not lose sight of the truth that the farmer's child is to be made a useful citizen, not only content to stay in the home in which he was born and reared, if that is best, but fitted to fill honorably any station in life to which he may be called. To do this he must have all the opportunities of education and culture that the city affords. This can be brought about in no other way than at the city's expense, for wealth is massed in our populous centers. The...
Page 13 - It marks the culmination of a process which had been going on steadily for more than a century. It marks the utmost limit to the subdivision of American sovereignty, — the high-water mark of modern democracy, and the low-water mark of the Massachusetts school system.

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