Idyls of the king. Author's ed

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Page 142 - The great and guilty love he bare the Queen, In battle with the love he bare his lord, Had marr'd his face, and mark'd it ere his time. Another sinning on such heights with one, The flower of all the west and all the world, Had been the sleeker for it : but in him His mood was often like a fiend, and rose And drove him into wastes and solitudes For agony, who was yet a living soul.
Page 218 - To reverence the King, as if he were Their conscience, and their conscience as their King, To break the heathen and uphold the Christ, To ride abroad redressing human wrongs, To speak no slander, no, nor listen to it, To honour his own word as if his God's, To lead sweet lives in purest chastity, To love one maiden only, cleave to her, And worship her by years of noble deeds Until they won her...
Page 225 - I wanted warmth and color which I found In Lancelot — now I see thee what thou art, Thou art the highest and most human too, Not Lancelot, nor another. Is there none Will tell the King I love him tho...
Page 218 - To lead sweet lives in purest chastity, To love one maiden only, cleave to her, And worship her by years of noble deeds, Until they won her ; for indeed I knew Of no more subtle master under heaven Than is the maiden passion for a maid, Not only to keep down the base in man, But . teach high thought, and amiable words And courtliness, and the desire of fame, And love of truth, and all that makes a man.
Page 211 - Sir Lancelot, as became a noble knight, Was gracious to all ladies, and the same In open battle or the tilting-field Forbore his own advantage, and the King In open battle or the tilting-field Forbore his own advantage, and these two Were the most nobly-mannered men of all ; For manners are not idle, but the fruit Of loyal nature, and of noble mind.
Page 95 - Master, do ye love me?' he was mute. And lissome Vivien, holding by his heel, Writhed toward him, slided up his knee and sat, Behind his ankle twined her hollow feet Together, curved an arm about his neck, Clung like a snake ; and letting her left hand Droop from his mighty shoulder, as a leaf, Made with her right a comb of pearl to...
Page 220 - Yet think not that I come to urge thy crimes, I did not come to curse thee, Guinevere, I, whose vast pity almost makes me die To see thee, laying there thy golden head, My pride in happier summers, at my feet. The wrath which forced my thoughts on that fierce law, The doom of treason and the flaming death, (When first I learnt thee hidden here,) is...
Page 45 - O purblind race of miserable men, How many among us at this very hour Do forge a life-long trouble for ourselves, By taking true for false, or false for true ; Here, thro...
Page 131 - ELAINE. ELAINE the fair, Elaine the lovable, Elaine, the lily maid of Astolat, High in her chamber up a tower to the East Guarded the sacred shield of Lancelot ; Which first she placed where morning's earliest ray...
Page 169 - And peradventure had he seen her first She might have made this and that other world Another world for the sick man; but now The shackles of an old love straiten'd him, 870 His honor rooted in dishonor stood, And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true.

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