A manual of entomology, tr. by W. E. Shuckard

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Page 539 - The male now, as amongst att other insects, speedily dies* after the impregnation of the female has been effected ; but the female from this period begins to swell enormously, from the development of her countless eggs, and by the time she is ready to commence laying...
Page 491 - ... receiving some of the ramifications of the optic nerve. According to Muller, who has been most successful in explaining the structure of these organs, each individual facet can survey but a small space of the entire field of vision, so that each contributes to the perception of all the objects within the field ; but each separate one does not at the same time see all such objects, whence the insect must receive as many forms of objects in its eye, as there are individual facets to the eye. This...
Page 506 - ... bees the members recognized one another by means of some secret sign or password. In all cases a stranger from another colony is instantly detected, and a home member as instantly known. This sign or password, says Burmeister, as quoted by Lubbock, "serves to prevent any strange bee from entering into the same hive without being immediately detected and killed. It, however, sometimes happens that several hives have the same signs, when their several members rob each other with impunity. In these...
Page 491 - ... separate one does not at the same time see all such objects, whence the insect must receive as many forms of objects in its eye, as there are individual facets to the eye. This consequence of a common and yet subsidiary vision of these facets, springs partly from the immobility of the eyes, and partly from the circumstance that only those rays of light which fall in a right line upon a facet of the eye, which itself forms the segment of a circle, can reach the optic nerve of this facet, whereas...
Page 144 - Salivary vessels which open into the mouth, generally beneath the tongue, sometimes at the base of the mandibles. They take the following forms : — 1. As simple, long, undivided, twisted tubes ; thus in the majority of insects, viz. all butterflies, many beetles, and flies. 2. As a narrow vessel which empties itself into one or two bladders, whence the salivary duct originates ( \< /m.
Page 300 - Capricorn beetle which is suddenly surprised by a loud sound will have seen how immovably outward it spreads its antennae, and holds them porrect, as it were, with great attention as long as it listens, and how carefully the insect proceeds in its course when it conceives that no danger threatens it from the unusual noise.
Page 300 - ... as before, but evidently perceived the difference, for they appeared alarmed, and endeavoured to escape. Hicks, in 1859, justly observed that " whoever has observed a tranquilly proceeding Capricorn beetle which is suddenly surprised by a loud sound will have seen how immovably outward it...
Page 235 - ... carbonate of ammonia, and therefore appears to contain no azote ; it burns without previously melting, but is soluble in boiling or heated sulphuric acid. " Besides the above, small portions of albumen, a peculiar brown colouring matter, which dissolves in caustic potass, but not in boiling alcohol, as well as traces of phosphate of iron, have been found in the horny integument of insects, upon different analyses. The albumen belongs doubtlessly to the third tunic, as does the brown colouring...
Page 425 - Every fly creeps as a worm out of the egg; then, by changing into the pupa,, it becomes a crab, and lastly, a perfect fly...
Page 468 - The aerial movements of the hive-bee are more direct and leisurely. When leaving the hive for an excursion, I have observed that as soon as they come out they turn about as if to survey the entrance, and then, wheeling round in a circle, fly off. When they return to the hive, they often fly...

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