Going Up the River: Travels in a Prison Nation

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Random House Publishing Group, Jun 1, 2001 - Social Science - 288 pages
3 Reviews
The American prison system has grown tenfold in thirty years, while crime rates have been relatively flat: 2 million people are behind bars on any given day, more prisoners than in any other country in the world — half a million more than in Communist China, and the largest prison expansion the world has ever known. In Going Up The River, Joseph Hallinan gets to the heart of America’s biggest growth industry, a self-perpetuating prison-industrial complex that has become entrenched without public awareness, much less voter consent. He answers, in an extraordinary way, the essential question: What, in human terms, is the price we pay? He has looked for answers to that question in every corner of the “prison nation,” a world far off the media grid — the America of struggling towns and cities left behind by the information age and desperate for jobs and money. Hallinan shows why the more prisons we build, the more prisoners we create, placating everyone at the expense of the voiceless prisoners, who together make up one of the largest migrations in our nation’s history.
 

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User Review  - VikkiLaw - LibraryThing

Lots of historical information about prisons in the U.S., but the focus is more on tracing the economic impacts of prisons with very little attention paid to race and the color(s) of who ends up in prison. Read full review

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User Review  - carterchristian1 - LibraryThing

Describes some shocking treatment of prisionerssuch as removin testicles and the more benign bibliotherapy making San Quinten one of the most literate prisons in the country. However when television was readily available to prisoners reading declined.An interesting book. Read full review

Contents

Dedication Epigraph Beginnings
CHAPTER
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 12
CHAPTER 13
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER 16
CHAPTER 17
Notes
Bibliography

CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 11

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About the author (2001)

Joseph Hallinan, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, has been writing about the criminal-justice system for almost a decade, first as a local reporter and later as a nationally syndicated correspondent for the Newhouse News Service. In 1997, Hallinan was named a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he continued to investigate American prisons. He now writes for The Wall Street Journal and lives in Chicago.


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