Weiss's Herbal Medicine

Front Cover
Thieme, 2001 - Health & Fitness - 362 pages
2 Reviews

The classic edition is back! First published in 1988, Weiss's Herbal Medicine is revered by herbalists and medical professionals alike as the seminal work in the field of phytotherapy. This book has established itself as an indispensable resource and is widely acknowledged as the key text in the field of medical herbalism.

You will find clear, detailed information on treating conditions ranging from colds and influenza to rheumatic problems, metabolic and endocrine disorders, cancer, and much more. Conveniently arranged by organ system, the text provides guidelines for prescribing herbal remedies, with sections on dosage, application, and precautionary measures.

Plus, for each plant discussed, you will find lists of their occurrence, botanical features, differentiation from related species, constituents, and medical benefits. Proprietary formulations, full references, and a comprehensive subject index of almost 2,000 entries round out the superb coverage!

Weiss's life's work examines the subject of herbal medicine from both a clinical and practical viewpoint, incorporating his personal observations and clinical experience with scientific studies. This material formed the basis of Herbal Medicine, 2E, also by Thieme. The second edition, revised, expanded and modernized by Volker Fintelmann, streamlines the work into a more clinical text, incorporating the latest scientific research and Commission E findings on the efficacy of herbs. This edition is recommended for allopathic physicians and other medical professionals who are new to the field of herbal medicine.

Professor Rudolf Fritz Weiss (1895-1991) is highly regarded as the founding father of modern German phytotherapy. He studied botany and medicine at the University of Berlin, qualifying as a doctor in 1922 and subsequently taking additional qualifications in internal medicine. A teaching post in herbal medicine was interrupted by war service as an army doctor, followed by seven years in Russian captivity as a doctor in prisoner-of-war camp hospitals. After retiring from clinical practice in 1961, he devoted his life to the scientific development and acceptance of herbal medicine. Weiss was appointed as a member of the German Commission E in 1978. He was founder and editor of the Zeitschrift fuer Phytotherapie, and lectured on current advances in the subject at the University of Tuebingen.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Must say I have find one very bad mistake in description of genus Matricaria, where two indentical pictures were used for "True" Camomila and Matricaria Inodora or "False" Camomila.
Picture is
showing "False" Camomila, and this is very POISONOUS plant.
In my country people growing Camomila got misled and are selling poisonous camomila in the shops, so I poisoned myself very badly instead of healing myself.
There is no advice what one can do in case of poisoning at all, must be author assumed nobody would be that stupid to use it.
Also it is quoted that "It would be lost time and effort to describe what Camomila is as everyone knows that".... check at http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/chammo49.html at least I believe it is same book.
Well, that may have been true in time of writting this book, but knowledge was lost for new generations, and I know it by chance, where my generation is now 3 generations in the past.
Regards from Croatia!
Marijan Pollak
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

It's a very useful detailed book! A lot of information you'll never find on other sites! I'm going to have it on my table.

Contents

Objections to Phytotherapy
4
Phytotherapy in Modern Medicine
10
GUIDELINES FOR PRESCRIBING HERBAL MEDICINES
17
THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
22
THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM
126
THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
194
NONSPECIFIC ENHANCEMENT
225
THE URINARY TRACT
234
SOME METABOLIC AND ENDOCRINAL CONDITIONS
271
THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
280
GYNAECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND DISEASES OF THE BREAST
307
HERBAL MEDICINE IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER
322
SKIN DISEASES
328
EYE DISEASES
339
HERBAL BATHS
346
Copyright

RHEUMATIC CONDITIONS
257

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - Lincoln's well-known dictum that "you can fool some of the people all the time, and all the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.
Page 154 - ... more soluble than pure convallatoxin. These substances are not unnecessary ballast but have key significance for the medicinal action of the whole extract."5 Rauwolfia serpentina - The number of rauwolfia alkaloids is considerable....!! has not so far proved possible to synthesize any of these....As with many other medicinal plants, the question soon arose as to whether the action was due mainly to reserpine or one of the other alkaloids, or whether a whole extract of the root would give the...
Page 64 - Molhuysen, JA, Gerbrandy, J., de Vries, LA, de Jong, JC, Lenstra, JB, Turner, KP, and Borst, JGG 1950.
Page 146 - One interesting discovery is that 60% of the preparation consists of the cardiac glycosides, the remaining 40% of substances that have no cardiac activity but play a major role in achieving solubility. They appear to be precursors or degradation products of the glycosides. If they are present, the mixture is 500 times more soluble than pure convallatoxin. These substances are not unnecessary ballast but have key significance for the medicinal action of the whole extract.
Page 165 - Drinks a glass or two of water the first thing in the morning and before going to bed at night, at recess in the morning, before lunch, in the afternoon, and other times when thirsty.
Page 295 - In addition, the plant has two raised lines down the stem. This is something quite unusual in the plant world. Round or four-square stems are the general rule. It is only H. perforatum which has these two raised lines, making the stem appear pressed flat.
Page 316 - Hormone therapy is much to the fore in this field, but there are considerable problems; hormone therapy calls for sophisticated techniques and in many cases fails to get results. Medicinal herbs therefore continue to have their place.
Page 105 - WHO-ORS control solution contains 3.5 g sodium chloride. 2.5 g sodium bicarbonate. 1.5 g potassium chloride and 20 g glucose...
Page 313 - Popular medicine has become firmly attached to this drug, which is in contrast to the lack of information on its efficacy. No gynaecological trials have been done and gynaecologists as a rule know nothing of its use.
Page 25 - The medicinal value of chamomile is largely due to three actions: it reduces inflammation, relieves spasm, and counteracts flatulence and the pain resulting from it. The...

About the author (2001)

Former member of the Commission E, Professor for Phytotherapy at the Universities of Berlin and Tbingen, Professor h.c., Germany

Bibliographic information