Classical Hindu Thought: An Introduction

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Oxford University Press, 2000 - Philosophy - 221 pages
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Hinduism is not only a religious belief, it is also a philosophy, based upon certain key concepts. Most of these originated, or were most fully articulated, during the "classical" period from the fourth to the tenth century BCE. In this concise and lucid book, Arvind Sharma introducescontemporary readers to the texts and ideas crystallized during this period and explains their contemporary relevance.The book is divided into sections, dealing with key concepts - such as karma, dharma, maya, moksa and varna - the main gods and goddesses of the Hindu pantheon - Devi, Siva, Brahma, Visnu - and texts such as the Purusarthas and Vedas. He also deals with different systems of yoga: Jnana-yoga,Bhakti-yoga and Karma-yoga.In one volume, the book offers readers an excellent grounding in the rich and diverse traditions of Hindu thought, and is an excellent introduction to the topic for anyone interested in Hinduism, yoga, Indian philosophy and religion.
 

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Contents

A Conceptual Introduction
1
A Historical Survey
35
Nirguna and Saguna
43
Isvara
62
Devi
68
The Hindu Trinity Trimurti
72
Brahma
76
Visnu
82
Maya
109
Moksa
113
Jfianayoga
119
Bhaktiyoga
123
Karmayoga
127
Varna
132
Asrama
181
Purusarthas
186

Siva
87
JIva
90
Samsara
94
Karma
98
Dharma
103
Vedas
191
bibliography
211
Index
213
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About the author (2000)

Arvind Sharma is the Birks Professor of Comparative Religion at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

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