The Revolution on the Upper Ohio, 1775-1777

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Genealogical Publishing Com, Jun 1, 2009 - Reference - 275 pages
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Unlike most accounts of the Scottish families who re-settled in Ulster beginning in 1612-1620 and continuing through most of that century, Linehan's essays focus less upon the animosities between the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians and Irish Catholics and more on their cultural commonalities. The author expands upon this theme in discussions of medieval Scottish and Irish history, which reveal that many of the Scots who migrated to Ireland in the 17th century were in fact descendants of Irish families who relocated to Argyle in 503. Linehan also discusses the founding of a number of Scotch-Irish communities, such as Antrim, New Hampshire. Genealogists will appreciate the list of the original Scottish settlers of the Ulster Plantation, 1612-1620, and the detailed name and subject index containing over 1,000 references.
 

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Contents

MOVEMENT TO KENTUCKY FRONTIER FORTS
1
LETTER FOR CORNSTALK
7
ORDERS FOR THE MILITIA
8
VIRGINIA HEARS OF LEXINGTON AND CONCORD
10
GARRISON AT POINT PLEASANT
12
AFFAIRS AT FORT PITT
17
VIRGINIA ARMS
21
TREATY AT PITTSBURGH 1775
25
FRONTIERS OF VIRGINIA
172
NEWS FROM FORT RANDOLPH
185
INDIAN DEPREDATIONS
188
THREATENED HOSTILITIES
190
FORTS ON THE OHIO
195
REINFORCEMENTS ORDERED
196
DISPOSITION OP THE INDIAN TRIBES
199
FORT RANDOLPH REINFORCED
204

BRITISH REPORT OF TREATY
127
CONNOLLYS PLOT
136
THE FRONTIERS EARLY IN 1776
143
A CAPTAINS COMMISSION
145
INFORMATION REGARDING DETROIT
147
INDIANS VISIT NIAGARA
151
ALARM IN KENTUCKY
153
PROTECTION FOR THE FRONTIER
155
GARRISON FOR POINT PLEASANT INDIAN AFFAIRS
158
CONFERENCE AT FORT PITT
159
REPORT FROM NIAGARA NEUTRALITY TO BE MAINTAINED
171
NEWS FROM WILLIAMSBURGH
214
TREATY OF 1776
216
SITUATION AT GRAVE CREEK
224
SUPPLIES FROM NEW ORLEANS
226
MILITIA ARRANGEMENTS
229
PLUGGYS TOWN EXPEDITION ORDERED
236
SITUATION AT WHEELING
242
ALLIES TO BE PROTECTED
244
PLUGGYS TOWN EXPEDITION ABANDONED
247
RETURN OF MILITARY STORES AT FORT PITT
258
INDEX
259

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About the author (2009)

Reuben Gold Thwaites (1853 - 1913) was an American librarian, historian and editor. He was born in 1853 in Dorchester, Massachusetts, and moved with his family to Omro, Wisconsin, in 1866. While teaching school, he studied college-level coursework and worked on local farms. He also reported for the Oshkosh Times. In 1874 he went to Yale University and studied history and economics as a special student. Though he never studied formally at the collegiate level beyond his time at Yale, he was awarded an LL.D. form the University of Wisconsin later in his life. Thwaites returned to Wisconsin two years later and settled in Madison, where he served for a time as managing editor of the Wisconsin State Journal. In 1885 he became Assistant Corresponding Secretary of the Historical Society of Wisconsin, and when Lyman C. Draper retired as Secretary in 1887, Thwaites was appointed to succeed him. It was a post he would hold until his death. Thwaites' scholarly reputation rested primarily as his skills as an editor of historical documents. Among the more important projects completed by him and his assistants during his years with the Society were: The Jesuit Relations and Allied documents (73 vols.), Lewis and Clark Journals (8 vols.), Early Western Travels (32 vols.) and Collections of the State Historical Society (vols. 11-20). He is credited with raising the scholarship surrounding the Lewis and Clark expedition to a new Level. He discovered and uncovered various additional original sources, including journal of Sergeant Charles Floyd, the only member of the Corps of Discovery to die on the expedition. Prior to that, general knowledge, as well as, serious scholarship were, for the most part, clouded by legend. However, he has also been criticized, especially recently, for failing to account for prejudicial and inaccurate sources while editing the Jesuit Relations. Not satisfied in being simply an academic, he was a historian who attempted to understand history by experiencing those aspects that he could, and bringing those experiences to life. He took canoe trips on the Wisconsin, Fox and Rock Rivers, took a bicycle trip across England, and took a trip down the Ohio River in a rowboat. Thwaites was a frequent lecturer on American history at the University of Wisconsin, and he was honored with an LL.D. in 1904. He was also president of the American Library Association from 1899-1900, and in 1910 he was named president of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association. Thwaites died of heart failure in 1913.

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