Cambridge Modern History, Volume 10

Front Cover
Sir Adolphus William Ward
Macmillan, 1907 - History, Modern
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I'm taking aice euro. (cambridge program). This book helped me with the zollverein. Thank you!
never take that class. ever. if you're in aice. leave before you do it.

Contents

From Verona to the Revolution of July
38
xvi
40
Lamennais Religious intolerance Louis XVIII at Ghent
44
Demands of the Ultras and of the Powers
50
The Concordat The end of the foreign occupation
56
Reconstruction of the Ministry
62
Royalist reaction
68
Projects of intervention abroad
74
The priestparty and education Successes of Villele
78
The Religious Orders Opposition of the Peers
84
Apparent success of Villele Repressive policy
90
LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIES
93
The Coalition defeats Martignac
96
Historical novels and histories
102
Piedmont Return of Victor Emanuel
108
Neapolitan Revolution crushed Rising in Piedmont
114
Risings in central Italy
120
The drama Historical works
125
CHAPTER V
131
Finance Commerce Industry
137
Naples France
143
The Netherlands Switzerland
149
Rising in the Papal States Demands of the Powers
155
Joseph de Maistres Du Pape
161
Cesare Balbo Massimo dAzeglio
167
The Treaty of Bucharest 1812
169
Turkey Russia and the Congress of Vienna
175
Rising in the Morea Periods of the war 180 Causes of the Greek success Their superiority at sea
181
Francis and Alexander at Czernovitz
187
Inaction of the Powers
193
Welh jns policy Russia prepares for war
199
Personal character of Ferdinand
207
Galitzin Mora American revolutionary agents
213
anticlerical policy
219
The Congress of Verona
225
Carlist party Fourth marriage of Ferdinand
231
Mendizabals policy and fall
237
Rule of Narvaez and the Moderates
243
Governments and provinces
249
PAGE The great fairs The Manila galleon Trade with China
255
The Indian population Mortality Epidemics
261
Tupac Amaru Reform of government
267
English contraband War of 1739 Bourbon reforms
273
The medieval spirit
279
The revolution in Buenos Aires
285
The double advance of San Martin and Bolivar
291
Estimate of Bolivar and his work
297
Political ideas in Spanish America
302
The European Powers Congress of Verona 308 Canning and the United States The Monroe message Recognition of South American independence
309
Pedro persuaded to stay in Brazil The Andradas
315
British intervention Dom Miguel and Dona Maria da Gloria
321
PAGE
337
CHAPTER VII
340
First session of the Diet The Elector of Hesse
346
Reaction against Liberalism in Prussia
352
Foreign policy of Metternich
358
The Wartburg festival Reaction Alexander of Russia
364
Success of Metternich
370
ECONOMIC CHANGE By J H Clapham M A Kings College Professor of Economics
371
The Belgian question Understanding of the Eastern Powers Treaty of Berlin 1833
376
Attempt at Protestant union Death of Frederick William III
382
LITERATURE IN GERMANY
383
Goethes early years in Weimar
389
Classicism and Romanticism
395
The Heidelberg Romanticists
401
Grillparzer The Romanticists and Goethe
407
CHAPTER XIII
413
The Committee of Ministers
419
Treatment of Poland at the Congress of Vienna
445
Reaction and administrative repression The second Diet
451
Attack on the Patriotic Society Trial and sentences
457
Galicia The Galician Diet 461 Austrian policy in Galicia 462 Prussian policy in Posen
463
Contents PAGE Military position of Russia
468
THE LOW COUNTRIES
517
Fundamental Law for the United Netherlands
523
Belgian opposition The Press
529
The Prince of Orange in Brussels
535
Dutch invasion under the Prince of Orange
541
Rise of Mehemet Ali
547
Convention of Kiutayeh
553
Better relations between Great Britain and Russia
558
Russia approaches Great Britain
564
The Luddite and other riots The Radical sections
576
Thistlewoods plot Riot at Glasgow Death of George III
582
Huskissons policy The Sinking Fund Customs Duties
588
Death of George IV Ministry of Earl Grey Benthams influence
594
Attitude of the Whig and the Tory parties Coleridge Canning
600
PAGE The Whigs in power Committee for Reform
603
Lord Durhams share in the work Lord John Russell
609
Wellington fails to form a Ministry Lord Grey recalled
615
Practical effects of Catholic disabilities
621
The Dublin Association Lord Kenmare
627
Question of the Irish Veto Vetoists and NoSecurity men
633
The famine of 1822 and its results
639
Wellingtons Ministry Attitude of Peel
645
Contents PAGE The Ministry accept Emancipation Provisions of the Bill
651
Irish policy of Ministers The Irish Church
657
The Ministry reconstructed Resignation of Lord Grey
663
Lord John Russell OConnell and the Whigs The Kings attitude
669
Melbourne and the Queen Collapse of the Radical party
675
Peels Ministry Marriage of the Queen Chartism 681 Owenism and the Trade Unions Agitation against the new Poor Lav
682
PAGE The United Empire Loyalists Acts of 1784 and 1791
688
Mission of Lord Durham The Act for the Government of Canada 693 Geographical conditions Communications
694
Erasmus Darwin Campbell Crabbe
700
PAGE
705
Coleridges criticism of Wordsworth
706
Shelley
712
The novel in the eighteenth century
718
Effect upon Continental literature
724
Cumulative effect of various economic changes
727
Mechanical inventions
733
Railways Agriculture
739
Transport improvements on the Continent
745
Sugarbeet Potato spirit The guilds
751
Engineering Social movements
757
CHAPTER XXIV
763
His historical method
767
Influence of Ricardo on Peel
773
Robert Owen
779
CHAPS PAGES General Bibliography 7856
788
The Doctrinaires 7913
791
ILL Reaction and Revolution in France 7945
794
Italy 7969
798
The Papacy 8002
802
Greece and the Balkan Peninsula 181231 8037
803
SPAIN
810
The Spanish Dominions in America 8127
812
The Emancipation of the Spanish Dominions in America 81821
818
Brazil and Portugal 8225
822
The Germanic Confederation 181540 82632
830
Literature in Germany 8338
833
Russia 83942
840
Poland 8423
842
The Low Countries 84851
848
Mehemet Ah 8525
858
Catholic Emancipation 8606
860
Great Britain and Ireland 183241 86770
870
Canada 8718
872
The Revolution in English Poetry and Fiction 87982
879
Economic Change 8839
883
By Rafael Altamira Professor of the History of
890
Chronological Table of Leading Events 8938
893
Index
899
Ferdinand returns to Spain His reactionary policy
909
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 705 - The primary imagination I hold to be the living power and prime agent of all human perception, and as a repetition in the finite mind of the eternal act of creation in the infinite I AM.
Page 704 - The thought suggested itself (to which of us I do not recollect) that a series of poems might be composed of two sorts. In the one the incidents and agents were to be, in part at least, supernatural ; and the excellence aimed at was to consist in the interesting of the affections by the dramatic truth of such emotions as would naturally accompany such situations, supposing them real. And real...
Page 706 - The secondary Imagination I consider as an echo of the former, coexisting with the conscious will, yet still as identical with the primary in the kind of its agency, and differing only in degree, and in the mode of its operation. It dissolves, diffuses, dissipates, in order to re-create ; or where this process is rendered impossible, yet still at all events it struggles to idealize and to unify. It is essentially vital, even as all objects (as objects) are essentially fixed and dead.
Page 705 - I hoped, might be of some use to ascertain, how far, by fitting to metrical arrangement a selection of the real language of men in a state of vivid sensation...
Page 707 - What soul was his, when, from the naked top Of some bold headland, he beheld the sun Rise up, and bathe the world in light ! He looked Ocean and earth, the solid frame of earth And ocean's liquid mass, in gladness lay Beneath him: - Far and wide the clouds were touched, And in their silent faces could he read Unutterable love.
Page 765 - All systems either of preference or of restraint, therefore, being thus completely taken away, the obvious and simple system of natural liberty establishes itself of its own accord. Every man, as long as he does not violate the laws of justice, is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest his own way, and to bring both his industry and capital into competition with those of any other man, or order of men.
Page 28 - European alliance and remain excluded from it until their situation gives guaranties for legal order and stability. If, owing to such alterations, immediate danger threatens other States, the powers bind themselves, by peaceful means, or, If need be, by arms, to bring back the guilty State into the bosom of the great alliance.
Page 11 - To facilitate and to secure the execution of the present Treaty, and to consolidate the connections which at the present moment so closely unite the four Sovereigns for the happiness of the world, the High Contracting Parties have agreed to renew their meetings at fixed periods, either under the immediate auspices of the Sovereigns themselves, or by their respective Ministers, for the purpose of consulting upon their common interests, and for the consideration of the measures which at each of...
Page 772 - That the maxim of buying in the cheapest market, and selling in the dearest, which regulates every merchant in his individual dealings, is strictly applicable as the best rule for the trade of the whole nation.
Page 771 - Because we think that the great practical rule of leaving all commerce unfettered, applies more peculiarly, and on still stronger grounds of justice, as well as of policy, to the corn trade, than to any other.

Bibliographic information