Divided Kingdom: Ireland 1630-1800

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OUP Oxford, Aug 28, 2008 - History - 544 pages
For Ireland the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were an era marked by war, economic transformation, and the making and remaking of identities. By the 1630s the era of wars of conquest seemed firmly in the past. But the British civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century fractured both Protestant and Catholic Ireland along lines defined by different combinations of religious and political allegiance. Later, after 1688, Ireland became the battlefield for what was otherwise Britain's bloodless (and so Glorious) Revolution. The eighteenth century, by contrast, was a period of peace, permitting Ireland to emerge, first as a dynamic actor in the growing Atlantic economy, then as the breadbasket for industrialising Britain. But at the end of the century, against a background of international revolution, new forms of religious and political conflict came together to produce another period of multi-sided conflict. The Act of Union, hastily introduced in the aftermath of civil war, ensured that Ireland entered the nineteenth century still divided, but no longer a kingdom.
 

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Contents

1 Lowestoft Suffolk 1665
1
2 The Crisis of Composite Monarchy
4
3 A War of Many Parts
60
Restoration Ireland
119
5 Freedom Religion and Laws
173
6 Metropolitan Province
208
7 New Lights and Old Faiths
249
8 Rulers and Ruled
286
9 Atlantic Island
344
10 Imperial Crisis
384
11 Revolution Contained
432
12 The Common Name of Irishman
494
Maps
499
Index
505
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About the author (2008)


S.J. Connolly is Professor of Irish History at Queen's University, Belfast.

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