The First and Last Journeys of Thoreau: Lately Discovered Among His Unpublished Journals and Manuscripts, Volume 2

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Printed exclusively for members of the Bibliophile Society, 1905 - Merrimack River (N.H. and Mass.)
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Page 51 - There was not a straight reach a mile in length as far as we went, — generally you could not see a quarter of a mile of water, and the boat was steadily turning this way or that. At the greater bends, as the Traverse des Sioux, some of the passengers were landed, and walked across to be taken in on the other side. Two or three times you could have thrown a stone across the neck of the isthmus, while it was from one to three miles around it. It was a very novel kind of navigation to me. The boat...
Page 52 - ... losing a part of our outworks, though the most exposed had been taken in. I could pluck almost any plant on the bank from the boat. We very frequently got aground, and then drew ourselves along with a windlass and a cable fastened to a tree, or we swung round in the current, and completely blocked up and blockaded the river, one end of the boat resting on each shore. And yet we would haul ourselves round again with the windlass and cable in an hour or two, though the boat was about one hundred...
Page 126 - ... benefit to him ; he seemed stronger, had a good appetite, and was able to attend somewhat to his writing; but since the cold weather has come, his cough has increased, and he is able to go out but seldom. Just now he is suffering from an attack of pleurisy, which confines him wholly to the house. His spirits do not fail him ; he continues in his usual serene mood, which is very pleasant for his friends as well as himself.
Page 51 - Sioux, some of the passengers were landed, and walked across to be taken in on the other side. Two or three times you could have thrown a stone across the neck of the isthmus, while it was from one to three miles around it. It was a very novel kind of navigation to me. The boat was perhaps the largest that had been up so high, and the water was rather low (it had been about fifteen feet higher).
Page 109 - They must accommodate his note-book and spy -glass; and so their width and depth was regulated by the size of the note-book. It was a cover for some folded papers, on which he took his out-of-door notes ; and this was never omitted, rain or shine. It was his invariable companion, and he acquired great skill in conveying by a few lines or strokes a long story, which in his written Journal might occupy pages. Abroad, he used the pencil, writing but a few moments at a time, during the walk ; but into...
Page 8 - clear out' to the West Indies, or elsewhere, — he does not seem to care much where. But I decided against the West Indies, on account of their muggy heat in the summer, and the South of Europe, on account of the expense of time and money, and have at last concluded that it will be most expedient for me to try the air of Minnesota, say somewhere about St.
Page 55 - Indians, who had come in on their ponies, and speeches were made on both sides thro' an interpreter, quite in the described mode; the Indians, as usual, having the advantage in point of truth and earnestness, and therefore of eloquence. The most prominent chief was named Little Crow. They were quite dissatisfied with the white man's treatment of them & probably have reason to...
Page 43 - ... Indians take to gather it, and prepare it for food, is as follows : A short time before it is fully ripe, two squaws will go amongst it with a canoe, and gather a handful of the straws together, tie them so, and then break down the heads and leave them hanging till it is dry enough to thresh. They have a double object in thus tying the straws together : one is to prevent the waving of the heads together by the action of the wind, and thus threshing out the grain, and the other to prevent the...
Page 121 - December, which at length resulted in a kind of bronchitis, so that I have been confined to the house ever since, excepting a very few experimental trips as far as the post-office in some particularly fine noons. My health otherwise has not been affected in the least, nor my spirits. I have simply been imprisoned for so long, and it has not prevented my doing a good deal of reading and the like. Channing has looked after me very...
Page 56 - ... earnestness, and therefore of eloquence. The most prominent chief was named Little Crow. They were quite dissatisfied with the white man's treatment of them & probably have reason to be so. This council was to be continued for 2 or 3 days — the payment to be made the 2d day — and another payment to...

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