Satires and Epistles

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 2002 - Literary Collections - 318 pages
The writings of Horace have exerted strong and continuing influence on writers from his day to our own. Sophisticated and intellectual, witty and frank, he speaks to the cultivated and civilized world of today with the same astringent candor and sprightliness that appeared so fresh at the height of Rome's wealthy and glory.

The Satires and Epistles spans the poet's career as a satirist, critic, and master of lyric poetry, as man of the world, friend of the great, and relentless enemy of the mediocre. "Horace," writes translator Smith Palmer Bovie, "is the best antidote in the world for anxiety. His Satires and Epistles demonstrate the good-humored freedom of a man who has cheerfully assumed the responsibility for making his own life not so much a 'success' as the occasion for a true enjoyment of virtue and knowledge." Bovie's impeccable translation, along with Clancy's edition of the Odes and Epodes, offers the reader a complete and modern Horace.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
11
III
13
IV
33
V
39
VI
46
VII
52
VIII
58
XXVI
170
XXVII
174
XXVIII
176
XXIX
177
XXXI
179
XXXII
183
XXXIII
188
XXXIV
190

IX
63
X
68
XI
70
XII
73
XIII
77
XIV
81
XV
99
XVI
104
XVII
110
XVIII
127
XIX
132
XX
138
XXI
144
XXII
150
XXIII
155
XXIV
157
XXV
165
XXXVI
191
XXXVII
194
XXXVIII
196
XXXIX
198
XL
200
XLII
203
XLIV
206
XLV
210
XLVI
214
XLVIII
220
XLIX
223
LI
225
LII
248
LIII
260
LIV
271
LV
293

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About the author (2002)

Smith Palmer Bovie (1917-1999) taught English at Columbia University and classics at Indiana University and Rutgers University. In addition to Horace, he also translated works by Virgil, Cicero, Napoleon, and others.

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