The Danubian Principalities: The Frontier Lands of the Christian and the Turk, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1854 - Balkan Peninsula
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Page 275 - Wallachia and Moldavia from their forced connexion with Russia, which cover its irregularity, and induce their inhabitants to suffer without complaint encroachments that bring material benefits in their train. Such cases exist in Europe; and there is an example of this kind in the conduct of Great Britain herself towards a state, smaller than these Principalities, it is true, but somewhat similarly situated, with the exception of the one great fact that there the principle of protection is just,...
Page 367 - Galatz, 135 piastres for the quarantine tax on nine persons, composing his crew, 2i piastres for the ticket given him, 435 piastres for the pay of the guard who remained on board during the term of observation, 150 piastres for the pay of two guards charged with watching his ship during the time of expurgation, and...
Page 340 - ... commenced their light drill, when I could hardly believe my eyes. No one seemed to be aware of the first principles of skirmishing, from the general down to the private, for battalion after battalion was allowed to go on in the same way, without a single remark; the two ranks of each file made no attempts to cover each other in advancing and retreating ; in fact, they generally moved together ; they fired, and stood to be fired at, instead of discharging their shot when they were about to move;...
Page 367 - ... &c., in her hold. The manufactured goods which she carried, and which were classed as susceptible of conveying contagion, were enclosed in tarpaulin covers, with certificates from the Russian consul at the shipping port ; she was furnished with a clean bill of health from Constantinople, and she was thirty days under the observation of the local authorities before her quarantine commenced, as she went from Galatz to Ibraila, and thence to Ziglina, where a guard was first placed on board.
Page 56 - Austrian rule ; and that another insurrection is projected, which is not intended to break out until its principles shall have spread over all the Sclavonian provinces of the Austrian empire ; while the Croatians now understand the error they fell into by opposing the Hungarians, and will in future make common cause with them. They were induced to follow their Ban in his campaign against Hungary, by promises of political...
Page 284 - Roman colonisation in Dacia, In the end of the third century the barbarians of the north invaded the Danubian provinces. Then, for the first time, appeared on these fertile plains the lawless ancestors of those rude Cossacks who may now be seen galloping through the streets of Bucharest with their lean ponies, carrying the forage which the terror of their long lances obtained for them from the timid and submissive Wallachians of the present day. The Roman legions, which had remained three hundred...
Page 387 - Is. 6d. The additional insurance demanded amounts to 6d. per quarter; a considerable sum on 300 or 400 cargoes which we draw from the Danube, and the trouble and annoyance occasioned deters a great number of vessels from seeking freights at the Danubian ports. The loss to the Principality of Moldavia on this last account alone has been calculated by a high authority at no less than 300,000/. during the past year, which is a sample of the benefits of Russian protection ; and, if the province that...
Page 386 - The lighters, in the meantime, are left to make the best of their way into the river again, and in so doing they are sometimes lost, with all the grain they may contain. When saved,, the wheat rarely escapes being damaged, and it is generally disposed of at a losing price to speculators, who avail themselves of these frequently -recurring opportunities to take advantage of the embarrassing position in which our shipmasters are thus placed. In consequence of these difficulties and risks, freights...
Page 375 - ... the river. The following account of the position of the bar of Sulina, and general exposition of the question, is in the main correct, though somewhat too lengthy and diffuse. From a desire to be full and complete, it not rarely happens that this writer falls into the opposite error of prosiness. ' A bar of mud crosses the mouth of the channel, and the water becomes so shallow over it when no steps are taken to preserve a suitable depth, that only vessels of light draught can enter or leave the...
Page 338 - The best hospital I saw at Bucharest was that of the Turkish army of occupation. In cleanliness and ventilation it surpassed anything of the kind that has as yet come under my notice ; and it was so well ordered in every respect, that there are few regimental surgeons of my acquaintance in her Majesty's service, who would not derive advantage from the study of its arrangements.

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