A Global Union for Global Workers: Collective Bargaining and Regulatory Politics in Maritime Shipping

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Taylor & Francis, 2006 - Political Science - 209 pages
This is a book about how global unionism was born in the maritime shipping sector. It argues that the industrial structure of shipping, and specifically the interconnected nature of shipping production chains, facilitated the globalization of union bargaining strategy, and the transnationalization of union structures for mobilizing industrial action. This, in turn, led to global collective bargaining institutions and effective union participation in global regulatory politics. This study uses a variety of source and analytical techniques, relying heavily on interviews with union official and other maritime industry people in many countries.
 

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Contents

Chapter One Introduction
1
Chapter Two The Maritime Industrial Environment
23
Chapter Three Global Collective Bargaining1
39
Chapter Four Transnational Union Networks and Enforcement1
65
Chapter Five Global Regulatory Politics and Skill Certification
89
Chapter Six Global Regulatory Politics and Labor Standards in the ILO
105
Chapter Seven Breaking No Eggs and Making No Omelets
121
Chapter Eight Conclusion
143
Appendix C
159
Appendix D
161
Appendix E
167
Appendix F
169
Appendix G
171
Notes
173
Bibliography
183
Index
197

Appendix A
155
Appendix B
157
Back cover
211
Copyright

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Page 186 - J. (eds) (2004) Varieties of Unionism: Struggles for Union Revitalization in a Globalizing Economy, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Gereffi, G. and Korzeniewicz, M. (1994) Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism, Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. Gill, S. (1995) "The Global Panopticon? The Neoliberal State, Economic Life, and Democratic Surveillance," Alternatives, 20, 1, Jan-Mar, 1-49.
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About the author (2006)

Nathan Lillie is a Fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. His articles on international unionism and labor standards have appeared in the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Relations Industrielles/ Industrial Relations, and Environment and Planning-A. He is currently researching the role of labor in global governance.

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