The Vulnerable Planet: A Short Economic History of the Environment

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Monthly Review Press, Sep 1, 1999 - Science - 176 pages
9 Reviews

From reviews of the first edition (1994): "Extraordinarily well written . . . "
--Contemporary Sociology

"A readable chronicle aimed at a general audience . . . Graceful and accessible . . . "
--Dollars and Sense

"Has the potential to be a political bombshell in radical circles around the world."
--Environmental Action

The Vulnerable Planet has won respect as the best single-volume introduction to the global economic crisis.

With impressive historical and economic detail, ranging from the Industrial Revolution to modern imperialism, The Vulnerable Planet explores the reasons why a global economic system geared toward private profit has spelled vulnerability for the earth's fragile natural environment.

Rejecting both individualistic solutions and policies that tinker at the margins, John Bellamy Foster calls for a fundamental reorganization of production on a social basis so as to make possible a sustainable and ecological economy.

This revised edition includes a new afterword by the author.

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Review: The Vulnerable Planet: A Short Economic History of the Environment

User Review  - Goodreads

Easy to read, environmental movement seen from historical and economical perspective. I'm Read full review

Review: The Vulnerable Planet: A Short Economic History of the Environment

User Review  - Goodreads

Has the potential to be a political bombshell in radical circles both in the United States and around the world…. Foster's arguments in The Vulnerable Planet give voice to views on population growth ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
7
ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS
34
THE ENVIRONMENT AT THE TIME
50
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

John Bellamy Foster is editor of Monthly Review. He is professor of sociology at the University of Oregon and author of The Ecological Revolution, The Great Financial Crisis (with Fred Magdoff), Critique of Intelligent Design (with Brett Clark and Richard York), Ecology Against Capitalism, Marx’s Ecology, and The Vulnerable Planet.

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