Indiana: An Interpretation

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Indiana University Press, 1947 - History - 300 pages
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Beginning with the State Fair as a window on Indiana as a whole, Martin interprets the Hoosier state and its history, from the Civil War and its impact on the state to the period during and just after World War II. As he says, "It is a conception of Indiana as a pleasant, rather rural place inhabited by people who are confident, prosperous, neighborly, easygoing, tolerant, shrewd."

 

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Contents

State Fair
3
BEGINNINGS
21
By Flatboat and Wagon
23
Wilderness fears
33
Senator Hannegan Son of the West
43
GROWTH
53
In Civil War
55
Revolt on the Farm
65
William and Powers Hapgood
159
FOUR GENTLEMEN FROM INDIANA
175
The 1920s
177
D C Stephenson Klansman
184
Court Asher Isolationist
201
Ned Gorrell Country Editor
217
Ralph F Gates GrassRoots Governor
235
THE CONDITIONS THAT PREVAIL
251

The Gas Boom
75
THE GOLDEN
87
The Best fears the Best Place
89
James Whitcomb Riley and Company
101
Leaders for the New Age
113
VOICES OF PROTEST
131
Eugene V Debs
133
The 1930s and 1940s
253
Straws in the Hoosier Wind
268
Acknowledgments
285
Bibliography
291
Index FOLLOWS PAGE
300
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About the author (1947)

JOHN BARTLOW MARTIN (1915 1988) was a journalist and free-lance writer who grew up in Indianapolis and was graduated from DePauw University. He worked for the Associated Press, was a reporter for the Indianapolis Times, and was the author of numerous articles, stories, and books.

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