The theory of stock exchange speculation, Volume 107

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Page 2 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle,; but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Page 3 - ... such as we are pretty sure of attaining, in case our life extend itself so far. If we hope for things which are at too great a distance from us, it is possible that we may be intercepted by death in our progress towards them.
Page 114 - ... Konstruktion des modernen Anleihewesens im Grunde ist, erkennen wir, wenn es sich etwa um die Versorgung der kleineren Staaten mit Schulden handelt. Bei ihnen ist, wie bekannt, geradezu eine Art von Geschäftsreisendentum in Anleihewerten organisiert: „now we have wealthy firms with large machinery, whose time and staff are devoted to hunting about the world for powers to bring out foreign loans " **. Naturgemäß ändert sich mit dieser Neubildung auch die Stellung des Anlehnsübernehmers...
Page 52 - ... made a judicious stake, just as if I had really moved a skilful move at chess; and that when I failed, I thought to myself, 'Ah, I knew all the time I was going wrong in selecting that number, and yet I was fool enough to stick to it...
Page 52 - I was distinctly conscious of partially attributing to some defect or stupidity in my own mind, every venture on an issue that proved a failure; that I groped within me for something in me like an anticipation or warning (which, of course, was not to be found) of what the next event was to be, and generally hit upon some vague impulse in my own mind which determined me; that when I succeeded I raked up my gains, with a half impression that I had been a clever fellow, and had made a judicious stake,...
Page 13 - ... of the events, A, B, C, &c. must happen at every trial, and each event brings with it a specified gain or loss. What may be expected to be the result of continuing to play a very great number of trials ; or what, in the long run,, may be expected to be the average produce or loss per game ? RULE. Multiply each gain or loss by the probability of the event on which it depends; compare the total result of the gains with that of the losses: the balance is the average required, and is known by the...
Page 2 - ... opinion, (as all are which go against the vulgar ;) yet we now find, that if there be any place upon the earth of that nature, beauty, and delight, that paradise had, the same must be found within that supposed uninhabitable burnt zone, or within the tropics, and nearest to the line itself. For hereof experience hath informed reason, and time hath made those things apparent which were hidden, and could not by any contemplation be discovered.
Page 25 - ... Each fortnightly settlement," Mr. Crump tells us, "occupies three days; the first is the carrying over or contango day, the second is the name or ticket day, and the third is the day for paying the differences, or the amount of money for stock or shares to be taken off the market. The settlements in consols is monthly, and near the commencement. The extent of the business transacted in the stock markets has been very accurately measured since the establishment of the clearing house. All transactions...
Page 28 - ... we have been pleased to associate with such organizations. To us syndicates are chiefly known as companies of great capitalists, foreign and domestic, who unite in taking public loans in immense blocks, and then selling in smaller parcels. An English syndicate, however, according to Mr. Crump, is " a combination of speculative capitalists which is formed either to divide a loan amongst them and unload their portions upon the public as opportunities may occur, or to ' wash ' a stock up and down,...

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