Trees: Their Natural History

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 17, 2014 - Nature - 401 pages
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Trees are familiar components of many landscapes and have been vital in determining the ecology of our planet as well as the development of human cultures and communities. Yet how much do we really understand about how they work? This updated and revised edition provides a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of tree biology and ecology and presents the state-of-the-art discoveries in this area. The wonders and mysteries of trees are explored throughout the book and questions such as why leaves turn spectacular colours in the autumn, how water reaches the top of the tallest trees, or why the study of genetics has caused so many name changes in trees are all brilliantly answered. Written with a non-technical approach, this book will be a valuable source of reference for students and those with a less formal interest in this fascinating group of plants.
 

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User Review  - Polaris- - LibraryThing

A very good overview of how trees work and the many adaptations and modifications to their environments they can achieve. Although the writing can be quite technical and scientific, Thomas' writing skilfully engages without alienating the lay person or the expert. Read full review

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About the author (2014)

Peter Thomas is senior lecturer in botanical and environmental science at Keele University, UK with 30 years of experience in ecological aspects of trees and forest ecology in the UK, North and Central America, Europe, Africa, Russia and Australasia. He has written two other books for Cambridge University Press: Ecology of Woodlands and Forests (with John Packham, 2007) and Fire in the Forest (with Robert S. McAlpine, 2010).

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