Natural Theology: Or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity (Google eBook)

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E. Goodale, 1819 - Natural history - 292 pages
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Review: Natural Theology

User Review  - Cynthia Egbert - Goodreads

While this is a bit dry in places, his use of analogy and even allegory is delightful and I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I do want to read it again in the future while reading The Origin of Species ... Read full review

Review: Natural Theology

User Review  - Goodreads

While this is a bit dry in places, his use of analogy and even allegory is delightful and I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I do want to read it again in the future while reading The Origin of Species ... Read full review

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Page 245 - It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water, teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. "The insect youth are on the wing.
Page 7 - I knew to the contrary, it had lain there for ever: nor would it perhaps be very easy to show the absurdity of this answer. But suppose I had found a watch upon the ground, and it should be inquired how the watch happened to be in that place; I should hardly think of the answer which I had before given, that, for any thing I knew, the watch might have always been there.
Page 224 - A law presupposes an agent, for it is only the mode according to which an agent proceeds: it implies a power, for it is the order according to which that power acts. Without this agent, without this power, which are both distinct from itself, the law does nothing, is nothing. The expression, "the law of metallic nature...
Page 251 - N'o anatomist ever discovered a system of organization calculated to produce pain and disease ; or, in explaining the parts of the human body, ever said, this is to irritate ; this to inflame...
Page 166 - Not to take notice of her covering it from the injuries of the weather, providing it proper nourishment, and teaching it to help itself; nor to mention her forsaking the nest, if, after the usual time of reckoning, the young one does not make its appearance. A...
Page 247 - Rousseau, to be the interval of repose and enjoyment, between the hurry and the end of life. How far the same cause extends to other animal natures, cannot be judged of with certainty. The appearance of satisfaction, with which most animals, as their activity subsides, seek and enjoy rest, affords reason to believe, that this source of gratification is appointed to advanced life, under all, or most, of its various forms.
Page 16 - I know no better method of introducing so large a subject than that of comparing a single thing with a single thing ; an eye, for example, with a telescope. As far as the examination of the instrument goes, there is precisely the same proof that the eye was made for vision, as there is that the telescope was made for assisting it.
Page 88 - Hunter's account of the dissection of a whale: — The aorta measured a foot diameter. Ten or fifteen gallons of blood are thrown out of the heart at a stroke, with an immense velocity, through a tube of a foot diameter. The whole idea fills the mind with wonder...
Page 250 - If he had wished our misery, he might have made sure of his purpose, by forming our senses to be so many sores and pains to us, as they are now instruments of gratification and enjoyment ; or by placing us amidst objects so ill suited to our perceptions as to have continually offended us, instead of ministering to our refreshment and delight.
Page 250 - But either of these (and still more both of them) being too much to be attributed to accident, nothing remains but the first supposition, that God, when he created the human species, wished their happiness; and made for them" the provision which he has made, with that view, and for that purpose.

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