Halleck: Lincoln's Chief of Staff

Front Cover
LSU Press, 1962 - Biography & Autobiography - 226 pages
6 Reviews
"Halleck originates nothing, anticipates nothing, to assist others; takes no responsibility, plans nothing, suggests nothing, is good for nothing." Lincoln's secretary of the navy Gideon Welles's harsh words constitute the stereotype into which Union General-in-Chief Henry Wager Halleck has been cast by most historians since Appomattox. In Halleck: Lincoln's Chief of Staff, originally published in 1962, Stephen Ambrose challenges the standard interpretation of this controversial figure. Ambrose argues persuasively that Halleck has been greatly underrated as a war theorist because of past writer.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
0
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Halleck: Lincoln's Chief of Staff

User Review  - Jagad5 - Goodreads

Halleck didn't do much to write home about, but Ambrose got his start by writing the book. Read full review

Review: Halleck: Lincoln's Chief of Staff

User Review  - Jonathan - Goodreads

Combined a fine strategic sense with an annoying personality. Read full review

Contents

Preface The Formative Years
3
From Chaos to Order II
13
Give Me Command in the West
23
The Siege of Corinth
41
Consolidating Recent Gains
55
McClellan Pope and Second Bull
64
The Guillotine for Unsuccessful Generals
79
Burnside and Rosecrans
94
Concentrate on Important Points
125
Gettysburg and Vicksburg
137
Responsibility and Odium
150
Chief of Staff
162
Total War
181
Victory
196
Bibliography
215
Index
219

Intrigue Along the Mississippi
108

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1962)

Stephen E. Ambrose (1936-2002), was Boyd Professor of History at the University of New Orleans and author of many biographies and histories, including D-day, June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II and Upton and the Army.

Bibliographic information