D.H. Lawrence: An Unprofessional Study

Front Cover
Swallow Press, 1964 - Literary Criticism - 110 pages
5 Reviews
In 1932, two years after D. H. Lawrence's death, a young woman wrote a book about him and presented it to a Paris publisher. She recorded the event in her diary: “It will not be published and out by tomorrow, which is what a writer would like when the book is hot out of the oven, when it is alive within oneself. He gave it to his assistant to revise.” The woman was Ana´s Nin.

Nin examined Lawrence's poetry, novels, essays, and travel writing. She analyzed and explained the more important philosophical concepts contained in his writings, particularly the themes of love, death, and religion, as well as his attention to primitivism and to women. But what Ana´s Nin brought to the explication of Lawrence's writing was an understanding of the fusion of imaginative, intuitive, and intellectual elements from which he drew his characters, themes, imagery and symbolism.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star

Review: DH Lawrence: An Unprofessional Study

User Review  - Paul Gleason - Goodreads

Nin's book provides a solid and passionately poetic introduction to Lawrence. She cuts to the core of his work and doesn't bear any of the prejudices against DHL novels known only to specialists ... Read full review

Review: DH Lawrence: An Unprofessional Study

User Review  - Stella Wang - Goodreads

Anais Nin definitely did a thorough job explaining Lawrence works, writing style, philosophy etc. I would highly recommend this if you're rly interested in Lawrence's works and his opinions about life. Read full review


The Approach to D H Lawrences World
Lawrences World

14 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1964)

Ana´s Nin (1903–1977) was one of the most unique literary figures of this century. As a novelist she was distinctly catalytic, and her life-long diary resembles no other in the history of letters. Her books have been translated in a dozen languages.

Bibliographic information