Galaxy Morphology and Classification

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 16, 1998 - Science - 111 pages
The classification of galaxies according to their shape is a fundamental tool in astronomy. It is through classification schemes that astronomers build a deeper understanding of how galaxies form and evolve. This long-awaited book by one of the pioneers of the field provides a concise and up-to-date summary of current ideas about galaxy morphology and classification. This is the first book dedicated entirely to the shape and classification of galaxies. It introduces the most widely used schemes, explains how they have developed and what they can tell us about galaxies. The author shows how very distant galaxies (seen with the Hubble Space Telescope, for instance) often defy standard classification schemes. Finally, he looks at recent work on the use of computers to automatically classify digital images of galaxies. This topical volume provides graduate students and researchers with a unique and indispensable reference on the classification and shape of galaxies.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 The Hubble classification system
9
3 De Vaucouleurs system
13
4 Elmegreens classification of spiral arms
17
5 Van den Berghs classification of galaxies
23
6 Morgans classification system
33
7 Galactic bars
39
8 Elliptical galaxies
47
11 Dwarf spheroidal galaxies
63
12 Low surface brightness galaxies
69
13 Morphology of active galaxies
79
14 Evolution of galaxy morphology
85
15 Computer classification of galaxy images
91
16 Problems challenges and conclusions
95
References
97
Object index
105

9 The SO class
55
10 Earlytype galaxies
59

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