Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1996 - Fiction - 244 pages
3235 Reviews
"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

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Review: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Blade Runner #1)

User Review  - Whitney - Goodreads

This was my first time reading Philip K. Dick and I really enjoyed his writing style. I can't quite put my finger on what exactly draws me to him yet. I will need to read more of his books. Otherwise ... Read full review

Review: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Blade Runner #1)

User Review  - Jon - Goodreads

It's been ages since I last read this, high school I believe. I like it a lot more now than I did then, but I do think I'm still finding it hard to separate from Blade Runner - one of my favorite ... Read full review

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About the author (1996)

Born in Chicago in 1928, Philip K. Dick would go on to become one of the most celebrated science fiction authors of all time. The author of 44 published novels and 120 short stories, Dick won a Hugo Award in 1963, and a John W. Campbell Memorial Award in 1975, and was nominated five separate times for the Nebula Award. Eleven of his works have been turned into films, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. He died in 1982.

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