Adela Cathcart, Volume 1

Front Cover
1864
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 51 - Father of eternal life, and all Created glories under Thee, Resume Thy spirit from this world of thrall Into true liberty!
Page 165 - More sea, more sea, more land, And rivers deep and wide." "And then?" "Oh, rock and mountain and vale, Rivers and fields and men, Over and over — a weary tale — And round to your home again.
Page 164 - A little town ; And a towering hill again ; More hills and valleys, up and down, And a river now and then.
Page 165 - Is that the end ? It is weary at best.' ' No, child; it is not the end. On summer eves, away in the west, You will see a stair ascend ; " ' Built of all colours of lovely stones — A stair up into the sky; Where no one is weary, and no one moans. Or wants to be laid by.
Page 277 - It is a very different thing to read one's own writing. I could read anything else well enough. — Will you read it for me, Henry?" "With pleasure, if it must be any other than yourself. I know your handwriting nearly as well as my own. It's none of your usual lady-hands-all point and no character. But what do you say, Ralph?" "Read it by all means, if she will have it so. The company has had enough of my reading. It will be a change of voice at least." I saw that Adela looked pleasedly expectant....
Page 291 - ... talking about what we should prepare for the next day. The door opened, and in came the most grotesque figure you could imagine. It was seven feet high at least, without any head, a mere walking tree-stump, as far as shape went, only it looked soft. The little ones were terrified, but not the big ones of us, for from top to toe (if it had a toe) it was covered with toys of every conceivable description, fastened on to it somehow or other. It was a perfect treasurecave of Ali Baba turned inside...
Page 204 - Be noble — that is more than wealth; Do right — that's more than place; Then in the spirit there is health And gladness in the face: Then thou art with thyself at one And, no man hating, fearest none.
Page 170 - I believe that is the word they use now-a-days." "I don't say they are," returned the doctor; "but many a pain is relieved by finding its expression. I wish he had never written worse." "That is not why I like them," said the curate. "They seem to me to hold the same place in literature that our dreams do in life. If so much of our life is actually spent in dreaming, there must be some place in our literature for what corresponds to dreaming. Even in this region, we cannot step beyond the boundaries...
Page 292 - ... names upon it. This caused a fresh explosion of joy. Nor was it the children only that were remembered. A little box bore my mother's name. When she opened it, we saw a real gold watch and chain, and seals and dangles of every sort, of useful and useless kind, and my mother's initials were on the watch. My father had a silver flute, and to the music of it we had such a dance, the strange figure, now considerably lighter, joining in it without uttering a word.
Page 291 - We then discovered that on all the articles there were tickets, which we supposed at first to record the price of each. But, upon still closer examination, we discovered that every one of the tickets had one or other of our names upon it. This caused a fresh explosion of joy. Nor was it the children only that were remembered. A little box bore my mother's name. When she opened it, we saw a real gold watch and chain, and seals, and dangles of every sort, of useful and useless kind, and my mother's...

Bibliographic information