Underground London

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Groombridge and Sons, 1862 - London - 244 pages
 

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Page 154 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 153 - Thames ! the most loved of all the Ocean's sons, By his old sire, to his embraces runs, Hasting to pay his tribute to the sea, Like mortal life to meet eternity ; Though with those streams he no resemblance hold, Whose foam is amber, and their gravel gold * : His genuine and less guilty wealth t...
Page 165 - Heads, for to see them, after the old custom ; and afore dinner they hunted the hare, and killed her, and thence to dinner at the head of the conduit. There was a good number entertained with good cheer by the chamberlain ; and after dinner they went to hunting the fox : there was a great cry for a mile, and at length the hounds killed him at the end of St. Giles's.
Page 51 - All sales of property under execution shall be made at auction to the highest bidder, and shall be made between the hours of nine in the morning and five in the afternoon. After sufficient property has been sold to satisfy the execution, no more shall be sold.
Page 193 - description of a well and earth in Lancashire taking fire by a candle approached to it," in 1667,* is the first known English account of inflammable coal-gas; nor of Dr. John Clayton's accidental discovery of the same fact a few years later, when he constructed the first gas-holder, by inclosing the gas in a bladder; nor of Dr.
Page 27 - And with the savoury fish indulge thy taste : The damsel's knife the gaping shell commands, While the salt liquor streams between her hands.
Page 24 - At this period, when the snow was lying very deep, a rapid thaw came on, and, the arches not affording a sufficient passage for the increased current, the whole space between Pancras, Somers Town, and the bottom of the hill at Pentonville, was in a short time covered with water.
Page 27 - To where Fleet-ditch with disemboguing streams Rolls the large tribute of dead dogs to Thames, The king of dykes ! than whom no sluice of mud With deeper sable blots the silver flood.
Page 100 - ... new sewer, and at a depth of three feet below the surface, immediately opposite the entrance to the church of St. Bartholomew the Great, the workmen laid open a mass of unhewn stones, blackened as if by fire, and covered with ashes, and human bones charred and partially consumed. This I believe to have been the spot generally used for the Smithfield burnings, the face of the sufferer being turned to the east, and to the great gate of St.
Page 161 - The first cistern of lead, castellated with stone in the city of London, was called the great Conduit in West Cheape, which was begun to be built in the year 1285, Henry Wales being then mayor.

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