Wanderings in Burma

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F.J. Bright & son, 1897 - Burma - 410 pages
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Page 153 - Nat, supreme of the three rational existences. In every state of existence let him continually and truly possess the excellence of wisdom, and according to his desire in practices pertaining to this world, and to the divine state, so let it be accomplished. Thus, in order to cause the voice of homage during the period of five hundred years to be heard at the monument of the divine hair in the city of Rangoon, let the reward of the great merit of giving the great bell called Maha...
Page 168 - Was the work of magnitude and labour ; it is not easy to ascertain precisely what was its exact height, but we conjectured it at least thirty feet, and in breadth at the base not less than forty. It is composed of brick, badly cemented with clay mortar. Small equidistant bastions, about 300 yards asunder, are still discoverable, there had been a parapet of masonry, but the whole is in a state so ruinous and so covered with weeds and briars, as to leave Very imperfect Vestiges of its former strength....
Page 167 - In the new Citie is the Palace of the King, and his abiding place with all his Barons and Nobles, and other Gentlemen; and in the time...
Page 342 - Above this rise six successively diminishing terraces, connected by curved converging roofs, the last terrace just affording breadth for the spire which crowns and completes the edifice. The lower half of this spire is the bulging mitre-like pyramid adapted from the temples of India, the upper half is the same moulded taper pinnacle that terminates the common bell-shaped pagodas of Pegu. The gilded htec caps the whole at a height of 168 feet above the ground.
Page 342 - ... of an English church. There are gates to each of these chambers, noble frames of timber rising to a height of four and twenty feet. The frame bars are nearly a foot in thickness, and richly carved on the surface in undercut foliage, the panels are of lattice work, each intersection of the lattice marked with a gilt rosette. The lighting of these image chambers is perhaps the most singular feature of the whole. The lofty vault, nearly 50 feet high, in which stands the idol canopied by a valance...
Page 168 - Small equidistant bastions, about 300 yards asunder, are still discoverable ; and there had been a parapet of masonry ; but the whole is in a state so ruinous, and so covered with weeds and briars, as to leave very imperfect vestiges of its former strength. In the centre of each face of the fort there is a gateway about thirty feet wide ; and these gateways were the principal entrances.
Page 166 - City is not very great, but it hath very great suburbs. Their houses be made with canes and covered with leaves, or with straw; but the Merchants have all one House or Magason, which house they call godon1, which is made of brickes...
Page 167 - Gate you may discover to the other, and they are as broad as ten or twelve men may ride a-breast in them : and those Streets that be thwart are faire and large, these Streets, both on the one side and the other, are planted at the doores of the Houses with...
Page 100 - January 1886, and the work of restoring the country to order and introducing settled government commenced. For some years the country was disturbed by the lawless spirits who had been multiplying under the late regime, but by the close of 1889 all the larger bands of marauders had been broken up, and since 1890 Upper Burma has enjoyed greater freedom from crimes of violence than the Province formerly known as British Burma. In the time of Burmese rule China claimed a certain shadowy suzerainty over...
Page 167 - Nut trees of India, which make a very commodious shadow, the Houses be made of wood, and covered with a kind of tiles in forme of Cups, very necessary for their use : the...

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