Oration on the life and character of Gilbert M. de Lafayette: delivered at the request of both houses of the Congress of the United States, before them, in the House of representatives at Washington, on December 31, 1834

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D. Fenton, 1835 - Generals - 78 pages
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Page 50 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man, As modest stillness, and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Page 18 - States are engaged, has left his family and connexions and at his own expense come over to offer his services to the United States without pension or particular allowance, and is anxious to risk his life in our cause — Resolved that his service be accepted, and that in consideration of his zeal, illustrious family and connexions, he have the rank and commission of major general in the army of the United States.
Page 75 - Pronounce him one of the first men of his age, and you have yet not done him justice. Try him by that test to which he sought in vain to stimulate the vulgar and selfish spirit of Napoleon; class him among the men who, to compare and seat themselves, must take in the compass of all ages ; turn back ; your eyes upon the records of time; summon from the creation of the world to this day the mighty dead of every age and every clime — and where, among the race of merely mortal men, shall one t>e found,...
Page 35 - May this immense temple of freedom ever stand a lesson to oppressors, an example to the oppressed, a sanctuary for the rights of mankind! And may these happy United States attain that complete splendor and prosperity, which will illustrate the blessings of their government, and for ages to come rejoice the departed souls of its founders.
Page 25 - As long as I thought I could dispose of myself, I made it my pride and pleasure to fight under American...
Page 77 - France rejected the principle of inherited power, in every station of public trust, excepting the first and highest of them all ; but there they clung to it, as did the Israelites of old to the savory deities of Egypt This is not the time or the place for a disquisition upon the comparative merits, as a system of government, of a republic, and a monarchy surrounded by republican institutions. Upon this subject there is among us no diversity of opinion ; and if it should take the people of France...
Page 76 - ... Lafayette to witness the consummation of his wishes in the establishment of a Republic, and the extinction of all hereditary rule in France. His principles were in advance of the age and hemisphere in which he lived. A Bourbon still reigns on. the throne of France, and it is not for us to scrutinize the title by which he reigns. The principles of elective and. hereditary power, blended in reluctant union in his person, like the red and white roses of York and Lancaster, may postpone to aftertime...
Page 16 - ... Benjamin Franklin and Arthur Lee as his colleagues in commission; nor did they think themselves authorized to confirm his engagements. Lafayette is not to be discouraged, The Commissioners extenuate nothing of the unpromising condition of their cause. Mr. Deane avows his 'inability to furnish him with a passage to the United States. • " The more desperate the cause,?
Page 19 - The Marquis de Lafayette, a young nobleman of great family connexions here, and great wealth, is gone to America in a ship of his own, accompanied by some officers of distinction, in order to serve in our armies. He is exceedingly beloved, and everybody's good wishes attend him. We cannot but hope he may meet with such a reception as will make the country and his expedition agreeable to him.
Page 18 - Whereas, the Marquis de Lafayette, out of his great zeal to the cause of liberty, in which the United States are engaged, has left his family and...

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