Revolution in the Head: The Beatles' Records and the Sixties

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Pimlico, 2005 - Music - 515 pages
3 Reviews
As dazzling as the decade they dominated, The Beatles almost single-handedly created pop music as we know it. Today, their songs are cited as seminal influences by stars like Oasis, Blur and Kula Shaker. Eloquently giving voice to their time, the Beatles quite simply changed the world.

Updated with material from The Beatles Live at the BBC and the Anthology series, this acclaimed book gets to the heart of The Beatles — their records. It draws on the author’s unique knowledge and experience to “read” their 241 tracks chronologically — from their first amateur efforts in 1957 to Real Love, their final “reunion” recording in 1995. With this engrossing classic of popular criticism, Ian MacDonald shows exactly why the extraordinary songs of the Beatles remain a central and continually surprising presence.

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User Review  - Wheatland - LibraryThing

A masterful discussion of each Beatles production, giving praise and criticism from a purely musical viewpoint, but placing each piece in objective historical, pop musical, and cultural context. The description of the production and release of Sgt. Pepper is alone worth the price of the book. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - neiljohnford - LibraryThing

What can I say. This is a brilliant book. The bulk of it is devoted to song by song discussions of The Beatle's output - it includes just about everything they ever recorded so you'll find songs that ... Read full review

Contents

THE BEATLES RECORDS
41
Note to Chronology
385
Recommended Further Reading
473
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Ian MacDonald was born in 1948. He was Assistant Editor of the New Musical Express from 1972-75. He also worked as a songwriter and record producer, and is the author of The New Shostakovich, The People’s Music and The Beatles at No. 1. He died in 2003.

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