Containing Balkan Nationalism: Imperial Russia and Ottoman Christians, 1856-1914

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Jul 18, 2016 - History - 336 pages
0 Reviews
Containing Balkan Nationalism focuses on the implications of the Bulgarian national movement that developed in the context of Ottoman modernization and of European imperialism in the Near East. The movement aimed to achieve the status of an independent Bulgarian Orthodox church, removing ethnic Bulgarians from the jurisdiction of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. This independent church status meant legal and cultural autonomy within the Islamic structure of the Ottoman Empire, which recognized religious minorities rather than ethnic ones. Denis Vovchenko shows how Russian policymakers, intellectuals, and prelates worked together with the Ottoman government, Balkan and other diplomats, and rival churches, to contain and defuse ethnic conflict among Ottoman Christians through the promotion of supraethnic religious institutions and identities. The envisioned arrangements were often inspired by modern visions of a political and cultural union of Orthodox Slavs and Greeks. Whether realized or not, they demonstrated the strength and flexibility of supranational identities and institutions on the eve of the First World War. The book encourages contemporary analysts and policymakers to explore the potential of such traditional loyalties to defuse current ethnic tensions and serve as organic alternatives to generic models of power-sharing and federation.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Russian Messianism in the Christian East 14531853
19
 Secularization and Ethnicization of Christian Minority Institutions 18531860
67
3 The Bulgarian Minority in Search of Ottoman and Orthodox Autonomous Institutions 18601870
106
4 Reconciling Rival Ottoman Orthodox Churches 18701875
145
5 Making Peace in Times of War 18751885
191
6 Coping with StateSponsored Balkan Irredentism 18851914
242
 Brothers or Infidels? 18561914
296
Conclusion
329
Index
335
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

Denis Vovchenko is Associate Professor of History at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, OK. He is the author of articles and reviews in scholarly journals such as Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of the History of Ideas, Middle Eastern Studies, Kritika, and Modern Greek Studies Yearbook.

Bibliographic information