Early English Poetry, Ballads, and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages, Volume 18

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Page 75 - Counseyle, and prayed hym to awake To gyve me counseyle what were best to take. Ha, ha! quod he, love doth you so prycke, That yet your heart will nothynge be eased, But evermore be feble and sycke, Tyll that your lady hath it well appesed; Thoughe ye thynke longe, yet ye shall be plesed. I wolde, quod I, that it were as ye say. Fye, fye, quod he, dryve suche dyspayre away, And lyve in hope, whych shall do you good. Joy cometh after, whan the payne is past. Be ye pacyent and sobre in mode; To wepe...
Page 216 - Out of the Lyon to enter the Vyrgyne. Lyke as the worlde was distroyed totally By the virgins sone, so it semed well A virgins sone to redeme it pyteously, Whose hye Godheed in the chosen vessell Forty wekes naturally did dwell. Nature wekes naturally dyd good of kynde, In the vyrgyn he dyd suche nature fynde. Thus wythout nature nature wonderly In a vyrgyn pure openly hath wrought; To the God of nature nothynge truely Impossyble is, for he made of nought Nature fyrst; whyche naturynge hath tought...
Page 201 - Pucell me sente, Agaynst my wedding, of the satyn fyne, Whyte as the milke, a goodly garment, Branded with perle that clerely did shyne; And so the mariage for to determyne Venus me brought to a ryall chappell, Which of fyne golde was wrought every dele. And after that the gay and glorious La Belle Pucell to the chappell was ledde, In a white vesture fayre and precious, Wyth a golden chaplet on her yalow hede; And Lex Ecclesie did me to her wedde; After which wedding there was a great feast, Nothing...
Page 35 - Or els by stedfast argumentacion. The whych was constitute by begynnyng, As on the reason, and if apparaunce Of the cause than by outwarde semyng Be hard and difficulte in the utteraunce, So as the mynde have no perceyveraunce, Nor of the beginnyng can have audience, Than must narracion begynne the sentence. And if it be a lytle probable, From any maner stedfast argument, We ordre it for to be ryght stable, And than we never begyn our sentement, Recityng letters not convenient, But thys commutacion...
Page 155 - Wo worth her maners and her goodlynes; Wo worth her eyes so clere and amyable; Wo worth such cause of my great sicknes; Wo worth pite on her not tendable; Wo worth her minde in disdayne so stable; Wo worth her that hath me fettered fast; And wo worth love that I do spend in wast. Wherefore of right I pray you to remembre All that I wryte unto you right now: How your true love is of age but tendre, His umble service we pray you alow: And he him selfe evermore emprowe, You for to please and give the...
Page 79 - Than in we wente to the garden gloryous, Lyke to a place of pleasure most solacyous. Wyth Flora paynted and wrought curyously, In divers knottes of marvaylous gretenes; Rampande lyons stode up wondersly, Made all of herbes with dulcet swetenes, Wyth many dragons of marvaylos likenes, Of dyvers floures made ful craftely, By Flora eouloured wyth colours sundry.
Page 54 - Edmunde's life martred with treson. Of the fall of prynces, ryght wofully He did endyte in all piteous wyse, Folowynge his auctoure Bocas rufully; A ryght greate boke he did truly compryse, A good ensample for us to dispyse This worlde, so ful of mutabilyte, In whiche no man can have a certente. And thre reasons ryght greatly profytable Under coloure he cloked craftely; And of the chorle he made the fable That shutte the byrde in a cage so closely, The pamflete sheweth it expressely; He fayned also...
Page 143 - And therewithall he caused to depaynte His face and hers, all under his complaynte. And to Venus he made deliveraunce Of his complaint by a short circumstaunce; Whiche ryght anone, when she had it sene, Began to laughe with all the courte I wene. Lo here the fygures of them both certayne, Judge whiche is best favoured of them twayne. Thus Godfrey Gobilyve did make such a sporte, That many lovers to hym did resorte; When I sawe tyme I went to Sapience, Shewyng to her with all my diligence Howe that...
Page 7 - When that these grayhoundes had me so espied, With faunyng chere of great humilitie In goodly haste they fast unto me hyed ; I mused why and wherfore it should be, But I welcomed them in every degre. They leaped oft and were of me ryght fayne; I suffred them, and cheryshed them agayne.
Page 62 - All perfite reason they do so comprehende, That theyr waye and perfite doctryne To the joye above, whiche is celestine. And yet also the perfite physyke, Which appertayneth well to the body, Doth well resemble unto the musyke, Whan the inwarde intrayles tourneth contrary, That nature can not worke dyrectly; Then doth physike the partes interiall In ordre set to their originall. But yet physyke can not be lyberall As the vii. science by good auctorite, Which ledeth the soule the way in specyall By...

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