Next: The Future Just Happened

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2001 - Business & Economics - 236 pages
2 Reviews
In Liar's Poker the barbarians seized control of the bond markets. In The New New Thing some guys from Silicon Valley redefined the American economy. Now, with his knowing eye and wicked pen, Michael Lewis reveals how much the Internet boom has encouraged great changes in the way we live, work, and think. He finds that we are in the midst of one of the greatest status revolutions in the history of the world, and the Internet turns out to be a weapon in the hands of revolutionaries. Old priesthoods—lawyers, investment gurus, professionals in general—are toppling right and left. In the new order of things, the amateur, or individual, is king: fourteen-year-old children manipulate the stock market and nineteen-year-olds take down the music industry. Deep, unseen forces are undermining all forms of collectivism, from the family to the mass market: one little black box has the power to end television as we know it, and another one—also attached to the television set—may dictate significant changes in our practice of democracy. Where does it all lead? And will we like where we end up?

A brave new world indeed . . . and who better to guide us through it than Michael Lewis, whose subversive, trenchant humor is the perfect match to his subject matter. Here is a book as fresh as tomorrow's headlines, and as entertaining as its predecessors.
 

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I just started reading this book that I happened upon in a used book store. Nearby was another Michael Lewis book so I grabbed that, too. The first book Of his that I read was LIAR'S POKER. I liked it so I knew these two would be interesting, entertaining, and informative.
NEXT: THE FUTURE JUST HAPPENED is about the Internet and its effect on world business, politics, and relationships. I have been learning about computers for some time now and thought this would be a useful read. So far, it's good.
Lewis is using 'case studies' to demonstrate his understanding. There is the story of a boy who made big bucks using online stock market sites. His success was investigated by the Securities Exchange Commission, the US Government's stock market police department. They considered that the boy's parents had made too much money too fast so there must have been criminal activity. But, really, it was the child who had mastered the stock market and made a small fortune (it might buy one house in today's market).
Lewis showed that the boy succeeded in part because online business has no face. Interactions with people are textual. No one knew or guessed that a boy was brokering deals, not an adult. And there was no mentor who was guiding him in business mores so he observed and came to his own conclusions.
It was fascinating, and there is more. That is only one of Lewis' examples.
 

Selected pages

Contents

THE INVISIBLE REVOLUTION
3
THE FINANCIAL REVOLT
15
PYRAMIDS AND PANCAKES
75
THE REVOLT OF THE MASSES
151
THE UNABOMBER HAD A POINT
211
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About the author (2001)

Michael Lewis was born in New Orleans, Louisiana on October 15, 1960. He received a BA in art history from Princeton University in 1982 and a Masters in economics from the London School of Economics in 1985. He is a non-fiction author/journalist of mostly financial themes. His books include Liar's Poker, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game, The Money Culture, Boomerang, Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt and The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine.

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