A Few Minutes Past Midnight

Front Cover
Open Road Media, Feb 28, 2012 - Fiction - 234 pages
4 Reviews
Toby hunts for the man who wants to kill a fallen star of silent film

As Toby Peters crouches behind a tombstone, hiding from a crazed gunman, the private eye thinks of Charlie Chaplin. A few days earlier, the pioneer of film comedy sat in Toby’s office, and told him of the hundreds of people who want him dead. Beloved when his public could not hear him speak, his political leanings have made him a pariah. Right-wing radicals, the Ku Klux Klan, and the fathers of the innumerable young women Chaplin has deflowered have all threatened the “Little Tramp.” But now someone has broken into Chaplin’s house with a long knife, telling him to quit making movies and leave Fiona Sullivan alone. Chaplin has never heard of Fiona, and wants Toby to find out why he’s supposed to stay away. Toby Peters is about to learn a lesson Chaplin learned years ago: If you want to stay alive in Los Angeles, keep your mouth shut.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - woosang - LibraryThing

A very ordinary mystery. It seemed the client (Charlie Chaplin) did a lot of the work for the detective that he hired. Toby Peters is average at best and appeared to be too obtuse to be a Private Eye ... Read full review

Review: A Few Minutes Past Midnight (Toby Peters #21)

User Review  - K - Goodreads

Another entertaining story from Stuart Kaminsky. The characters are as quirky as ever and the humor makes me want to read excerpts aloud to my family. This Toby Peters story brings a good mystery ... Read full review

All 4 reviews »

Contents

9
10
11
12
13
Epilogue
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Stuart M. Kaminsky (1934–2009) was one of the most prolific crime fiction authors of the last four decades. Born in Chicago, he spent his youth immersed in pulp fiction and classic cinema—two forms of popular entertainment which he would make his life’s work. After college and a stint in the army, Kaminsky wrote film criticism and biographies of the great actors and directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age. In 1977, when a planned biography of Charlton Heston fell through, Kaminsky wrote Bullet for a Star, his first Toby Peters novel, beginning a fiction career that would last the rest of his life. Kaminsky penned twenty-four novels starring the detective, whom he described as “the anti-Philip Marlowe.” In 1981’s Death of a Dissident, Kaminsky debuted Moscow police detective Porfiry Rostnikov, whose stories were praised for their accurate depiction of Soviet life. His other two series starred Abe Lieberman, a hardened Chicago cop, and Lew Fonseca, a process server. In all, Kaminsky wrote more than sixty novels. He died in St. Louis in 2009.

Bibliographic information