Trying Hard is Not Good Enough: How to Produce Measurable Improvements for Customers and Communities

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BookSurge Pub., 2009 - Political Science - 179 pages
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The Results-Based Accountability (RBA) framework can be used to improve the quality of life in communities, cities, counties, states and nations, including everything from the well-being of children to the creation of a sustainable environment. It can help government and private sector agencies improve the performance of their programs and make them more customer-friendly and effective. RBA is a common sense approach that replaces all the complicated jargon-laden methods foisted on us in the past. The methods can be learned and applied quickly. And all the materials are free for use by government and non-profit organizations. In addition to providing practical methods, the book also makes a contribution to social theory by explaining the contribution relationship between program performance and community quality of life. As such it is a valuable tool for both program administrators and evaluators. A workshop DVD is also available from resultsleadership.org. The RBA framework has been used in over 40 states and countries around the world.

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About the author (2009)

Mark Friedman grew up in Silver Spring, Maryland. In high school he organized a rally against apartheid & got arrested at the South African embassy. He attended film school at the University of Southern California, where he wrote a short film titled "Broken Record," which the Disney Channel optioned for a cable television movie. Friedman has also worked on the Dukakis campaign, read scripts for the Fox Network, taught for the "Princeton Review," attended law school for a semester, & attended the writing program at Johns Hopkins University, where he is currently a visiting lecturer. His book "Columbus Slaughters Braves" was inspired by a 1995 baseball game in which Cal Ripkin broke Lou Gehrig's consecutive games record. Though Friedman loves baseball for its innate drama, he maintains that he has no athletic ability whatsoever. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

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