Novels, Novelists, and Readers: Toward a Phenomenological Sociology of Literature

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SUNY Press, 1991 - Literary Criticism - 324 pages
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Focusing on British and American novels, Rogers takes a sociological look at the business of literature, the book industry, and the experiences of novelists and readers. Viewing the novel as a vehicle of cultural meaning, the author shows how the literary canon overlooks substantial similarities among novels in favor of restrictive codes based on social as well as literary considerations. She emphasizes the kinship between the social sciences and humanities in her analysis, by reinvigorating affection for the novel and also establishing its rich cultural significance.
 

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Contents

The World of Literature
5
Selfexperiences and Novel Making
21
Novel Making and the World of Everyday Life
35
Novels and Everyday Life
51
The Uses of Privacy
71
Readers Selfexperiences
91
Novel Making Novel Reading and Literary Interaction
107
Literary Socialization
129
The Art of Social Worlds and the Science of Social Worlds
175
The Fictive
203
Additional Novels in the Sample
213
Notes
217
Bibliography
261
Proper Name Index
311
Subject Index
321
Copyright

The Business of Literature
153

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About the author (1991)

Mary F. Rogers is Professor of Sociology at The University of West Florida.

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