The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 1

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J. Nichol, 1855
 

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Contents

Upon the death of the Earl of Dundee
49
a Panegyrical Poem dedicated to the memory of the late Conntess of Abingdon
50
a Pastoral Elegy
64
On the Death of a very Young Gentleman
67
Upon young Mr Rogers of Gloucestershire
69
Epitaph on the Lady Whitmore
70
Epitaph onSirPalmesFalrbones tomb in Westminster Abbey
71
Under Mr Miltons picture before his Paradise Lost
72
On the monument of a fair Maiden Lady who died at Bath and is there interred
73
Epitaph on Mrs Margaret Paston of Burningham in Norfolk
74
On the monument of the Marquis of Winchester
75
SONGS ODES AND A MASQUE
76
On the Young Statesmen
77
IjvfJII A Song for St Cecilias Day
78
The Tears of Amynta for the
81
The Ladys Song
82
A Song VII A Song VIII Roundelay IX A Song X A Song to a fair Young Lady going out of town
86
Song in the Indian Emperor
87
Song in The Maiden Queen
88
Songs in The Conquest of Granada XIV Song of the Seafight in Amboyna
91
Incantation in CEdipus
92
Songs in Albion and Albanius
93
Songs in King Arthur
95
Spring
97
Song of Jealousy in Love Triumphant 09
99
SongFarewell fair Armida
100
an Ode in honour of St Cecilias Day
101
The Secular Masque
107
PACK
108
Song of a Scholar and his Mistress
111
PROLOGUES AND EPILOGUES I Prologue to The Rival Ladies
113
Prologue to The Indian Queen
114
Epilogue to The Indian Queen
115
Epilogue to The Indian Emperor
116
Prologue to Sir Martin Marrall
117
Prologue to The Tempest
118
Prologue to Tyrannic Love
119
Epilogue to The Wild Gallant
120
Prologue spoken the first day of the Kings House acting after the fire of London
122
Epilogue to the Second Part of the Conquest of Gra nada
123
Prologue to Aboyna
125

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Page 103 - His glowing cheeks, his ardent eyes; And while he Heaven and Earth defied Changed his hand and check'd his pride. He chose a mournful Muse Soft pity to infuse: He sung Darius great and good, By too severe a fate Fallen, fallen, fallen, fallen, Fallen from his high estate, And weltering in his blood; Deserted at his utmost need By those his former bounty fed; On the bare earth exposed he lies Alexander's Feast 109 With not a friend to close his eyes.
Page 102 - Flushed with a purple grace He shows his honest face: Now give the hautboys breath; he comes, he comes! Bacchus , ever fair and young , Drinking joys did first ordain : Bacchus...
Page 72 - THREE Poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next in majesty •, In both the last. The force of Nature could no further go ; To make a third, she joined the former two.
Page 101 - Happy, happy, happy pair ! None but the brave, None but the brave, None but the brave deserves the fair.
Page 30 - Better to hunt in fields for health unbought Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise for cure on exercise depend : God never made His work for man to mend.
Page 105 - Now strike the golden lyre again ; A louder yet, and yet a louder strain. Break his bands of sleep asunder, And rouse him, like a rattling peal of thunder. Hark, hark, the horrid sound Has raised up his head; As awaked from the dead, And, amazed, he stares around. •Revenge, revenge!
Page 104 - is toil and trouble; Honour, but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying: If the world be worth thy winning, Think, O think it worth enjoying; Lovely Tha'is sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee.
Page 106 - At last divine Cecilia came, Inventress of the vocal frame; The sweet enthusiast, from her sacred store, Enlarged the former narrow bounds, And added length to solemn sounds, With Nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown before. Let old Timotheus yield the prize, Or both divide the crown : He raised a mortal to the skies: She drew an angel down.
Page 201 - I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine, which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality ; and retract them. If lie be my enemy, let him triumph ; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance. It becomes me not to draw my pen in the defence of a bad cause, when I have so often drawn it for a good one.
Page 193 - Tales, their humours, their features, and the very dress, as distinctly as if I had supped with them at the Tabard in Southwark.

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