Racism in Indian Country

Front Cover
Peter Lang, 2009 - Social Science - 240 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
In the face of huge challenges, despite crushing social conditions, Indian people have survived. Racism in Indian Country exposes, for the first time, the degrading and inhuman treatment Indian people have had - and continue - to endure. This book provides numerous examples including the sterilization of thousands of Indian women without their consent, and the poor treatment Indians receive in our schools, resulting in the worst academic records - and the highest dropout rate, 50 percent - of any ethnic group. Subjected to constant harassment by anti-Indian groups, and banks and other lending institutions that either raise interest rates on loans to Indians or redline their reservations, Indians receive some of the most racist treatment in the United States. This book's thorough documentation and explication of the challenges faced by Indians historically and today will be useful in courses in modern history, ethnic studies, sociology, and anthropology.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Infernal BIA
9
Stereotypes of Indians
18
Racial NameCalling
29
Whats the Big Deal?
33
Fake Indians
41
Border Towns
52
Hate Groups
61
Racism in Sexual Abuse
159
Racism in Housing
162
Racism in Child Stealing
167
Racism in Sports
173
Racism in Stores and Restaurants
178
Racism in Politics and Voting
183
Racism in Natural Resources
193
Racism in Oil and Gas Royalties
204

Racism and Wildlife
65
Redlining
71
Racism and Murder
76
Racism in Education
102
Racism in Employment
141
Racism in Medicine
147
Racism in Law Enforcement
152
Racism in the Environment
209
Racism in Religion
213
Racism and Suicide
221
Racism and Alcohol
224
Bibliography
227
Index
235
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

The Author: Dean Chavers is Director of Catching the Dream, a national scholarship and school improvement organization in Albuquerque. He earned a doctorate and two M.A. degrees from Stanford University.

Bibliographic information