Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid

Front Cover
Penguin, 2000 - Artificial intelligence - 777 pages
1564 Reviews
'What is a self, and how can a self come out of inaminate matter?' This is the riddle that drove Hofstadter to write this extraordinary book. Linking together the music of J.S. Bach, the graphic art of Escher and the mathematical theorems of Godel, as well as ideas drawn from logic, biology, psychology, physics and linguistics, Douglas Hofstadter illuminates one of the greatest mysteries of modern science: the nature of human thought processes. 'Every few decades an unknown author brings outa book of such depth, clarity, range, wit, beauty and originality that it is recognized at once as a major literary event. This is such a work' - Martin Gardner

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Great introduction to the recent edition. - Goodreads
Massively overhyped, atrocious writing. - Goodreads
Pretty pictures with hidden depth. - Goodreads
It's a compendium of the most varied sorts. - Goodreads
Couldn't read it tooooo damn difficult to read - Goodreads
Simply incredible writing. - Goodreads

Review: Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid

User Review  - Erik - Goodreads

I started out very interested in this book, but after a while, my interest waned drastically. I am not going to take the time to carefully analyze why, but the end result is that it couldn't hold my interest enough to make me want to see it through. I make it through about half of the book. Read full review

Review: Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid

User Review  - Kirby Obsidian - Goodreads

Brilliant!!! I absolutely love this book, for its inventiveness, for how it syntesizes and interweaves the knowledge, the insights and the 'elegance' of so many disciplines, and for its sense of play ... Read full review

About the author (2000)

Douglas Hofstadter is professor of computer science and cognitive science at Indiana University. GODEL, ESCHER, BACH won the 1980 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.

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