Thinking in the Light of Time: Heidegger's Encounter with Hegel

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SUNY Press, Mar 9, 2000 - Philosophy - 406 pages
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Heidegger's lifelong project of exposing and deconstructing the presuppositions governing the history of metaphysics begins with the conception of temporality outlined in Being and Time, a work which Heidegger never completed. In Thinking in the Light of Time, de Boer not only traces the notion of temporality developed in Being and Time, but goes beyond the published portion of that work to offer a reconstruction of its pivotal third division based on a systematic interpretation of other works, many of which have only recently been published. Emphasizing the continuity between Heidegger's early and later thought, de Boer provides a systematic interpretation of Heidegger's work as a whole.

Hegel's claim to have perfected metaphysics is central to de Boer's concern with Heidegger's attempt to deconstruct metaphysics. Heidegger's struggles to come to terms with Hegel's speculative science, especially the manner in which Hegel regards his own project as founded upon an understanding of time, is thus one of the focal points of de Boer's interpretation of Heidegger's deconstruction of metaphysics. De Boer argues that it is especially in his reading of Hegel that one sees how deeply Heidegger is committed to the attempt to do justice to the radical finitude of human life and its possible philosophical self-interpretations. Her reading of Heidegger shows how his works paved the way for the deconstructive efforts that guide Derrida's thought.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Time and Method
7
Introduction
9
The Development of Being and Time
13
12 Back to Aristotle
15
13 The Temporal Meaning of Ousia
27
14 Beyond Husserl and Dilthey
31
15 The Meaning of Being in Being and Time
33
66 Being and Thinking
166
67 The Language of Being
169
68 The Anaximander Saying
176
69 Time and Being from 1962
188
Heidegger and Hegel
195
Introduction
197
The Power of Time
203
72 Aristotles Interpretation of Negativity and Movement
205

16 Being and Essence
37
The Analytic of Dasein
41
22 Dasein and Ontology
44
23 Inauthenticity and Authenticity
46
24 Temporality
47
25 A Sketch of the Analytic of Dasein
49
The Initial Attempt to Elaborate Time and Being
61
32 Inauthentic and Authentic Thinking
66
33 The Analogous Structures of Dasein and Ontology
69
The Temporality of Thinking Heideggers Method
79
41 Phenomenology as a Basic Problem for Itself
80
42 The Formal Indication
87
43 The Analytic of Dasein from a Methodical Perspective
92
44 Heideggers Concept of Phenomenology in Being and Time
98
45 The Temporal Threefoldness of Heideggers Method
105
46 Deconstruction Reduction and Construction
109
The Turn toward Being Itself in The Basic Problems of Phenomenology
115
51 The Ontological Difference
116
53 The Modifications of Being
119
54 The TruthCharacter of Being
123
55 Why the Third Division Was Not Published
129
Heideggers Later Works
137
The Gigantic Strife of Being for Itself
139
61 The Texts Published around 1930
140
62 Being Itself as the Occurrence of Being and Time
143
63 The History of Being as the History of Thinking
148
64 Heideggers Interpretation of the First Thinkers
155
65 Nietzsche and Holderlin
158
73 A TugofWar for Kant
211
Hegels Logic as a Deconstruction of Metaphysics
221
82 The Rise and Fall of Discursive Metaphysics
227
83 The Concept
234
84 The Eternal Movement of the Concept
241
Concept Time and History
247
92 Heideggers Interpretation of Hegel in Being and Time
255
93 From NowTime to Temporality
262
The Threefold of Thinking Heideggers and Hegels Conception of Method
267
101 Traces of the Dialectic in Heideggers Early Work
268
102 Absolvent Knowing
271
103 The Problem of Method in Hegels Phenomenology of Spirit
273
104 Heideggers Modification of Hegels Methodical Principle
277
105 Being and Time and the Phenomenology of Spirit
281
106 The Obstinacy of Absolute Knowing
283
Bound by the Logos Heideggers Later Texts on Hegel
287
111 The Sembling SelfDependence of Thinking
288
112 A Different Philosophical History of Philosophy
290
113 The Origin of OntoTheology
294
114 Heideggers Radicalization of Hegels Concept of Negativity
297
115 The Hidden Movement of History
304
116 The Absolute as Semblance of Being
310
Afterword
313
Notes
315
Bibliography
389
Author Index
401
Subject Index
403
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About the author (2000)

Karin de Boer teaches Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam.

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