Teaching Problems and the Problems of Teaching

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2001 - Education - 496 pages
In this fascinating book, an experienced classroom teacher takes us into her fifth-grade math class through the course of a year and shows how classroom dynamics--the complex relationship of teacher, student, and content--are critical in improving student performance. Magdalene Lampert offers an original model of teaching practice that casts new light on the ways teachers can successfully deal with teaching problems.
"Although the setting is mathematics, the value of Lampert's book is broad, addressing the core issues that face anyone in education. This is one of the most important books about education to appear in the past decade. What Lampert writes is deep and compelling. The story is engaging, even gripping; I couldn't put it down."--Jim Stigler, author of The Learning Gap
"Marvellous insight into the teacher's craft. . . . A well-crafted, modest, richly pleasurable, even gripping, book, that says more about the challenges and pleasures of teaching (and learning) than a host of manuals could. You don't need to be a mathematics teacher to enjoy it, although once you have read it, you may wish you were. Excellent."--Michael Duffy, Times Educational Supplement
"This book should be required reading for researchers of mathematics teaching, for teacher educators, and for teachers who wish to develop into reflective practitioners."--Erna Yackel, Journal of Research in Mathematics Education
"This very readable book is invaluable for teacher preparation colleges."--Choice
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Understanding Teaching Why Is It So Hard?
1
Teaching with Problems
3
Why Teach with Problems?
4
What I Teach with Problems
5
A Case of Teaching
6
An Instance of Teaching Practice
9
Zooming in to a Lesson on Rate
10
Teaching Richard Catherine and Awad
14
Teaching to Deliberately Connect Content Across Lessons
179
Anticipating the Connections That Can Be Made in a Problem Context
180
Teaching This Mathematics to This Class
188
Problems in Teaching in the Domain of Deliberately Connecting Content Across Lessons
210
Teaching to Cover the Curriculum
213
Viewing the Teaching of Topics Through WideAngle Lenses
217
Teaching Topics as Connected Elements of the Big Ideas in a Discipline
220
Cases of Teaching Conceptual Fields
223

Teaching Anthony and Tyrone
19
Teaching Ellie Sam and Yasu
23
From Narrative to Analysis
27
Why I Wrote This Bookand How
29
A Basic Model of Practice
30
Teaching Across the Year Across Students and Across the Curriculum
35
An Unusual Research Program
38
Figuring out How to Display the Work of Teaching
41
Where Do Teaching Problems Arise?
45
Teaching to Establish a Classroom Culture
51
Arranging the Physical Environment to Support a Classroom Culture
54
Choosing Mathematical Content to Complement CultureBuilding Practices
56
Zooming in on the First Mathematics Lesson of the Year
59
Introducing Conditions Conjectures and Revision
65
Establishing Structures for Students Independent and Collaborative Activities
79
Establishing Norms for Written Communication
84
What Kind of Work Is This?
92
Problems in Teaching in the Domain of Establishing Classroom Culture
97
Teaching While Preparing for a Lesson
101
Learning About My Students and Their Capacity to Study This Mathematics
108
Problems in Teaching in the Domain of Preparing a Lesson
117
Teaching While Students Work Independently
121
Teaching Problems in OneonOne Interactions with Students
122
Teaching Students to Study Collaboratively
127
Observing and Making Sense of the Range of Student Performance
131
Teaching Problems in the Domain of Supporting Students Independent Work
139
Teaching Problems in Other Domains Caused by Students Independent Work on Mathematics Problems
141
Teaching While Leading a WholeClass Discussion
143
Teaching in the Moment so the Whole Class Can Study
144
Linking Students with Content Across Events
159
Using Students to Take the Class into New Mathematical Territory
164
Problems in Teaching in the Domain of Leading a WholeClass Discussion
174
Problems in a Lesson Lead to LargerScale Problems
176
Teaching Again in the Same Conceptual Field
240
Common Contexts and the Work of Coverage Across Lessons
255
Invisible Work
259
New Problems Raised by Reformulating Coverage in Terms of Conceptual Fields
262
Teaching Students to Be People Who Study in School
265
Teaching Intellectual Courage Intellectual Honesty and Wise Restraint
266
Teaching Richard from September to December
268
Teaching Saundra to Think and to Reason
287
Problems of Practice in Teaching Students to Be People Who Study in School
325
Teaching the Nature of Accomplishment
329
A Quiz on Fractions as a Resource for Teaching About Accomplishment
332
Problems in Teaching the Nature of Progress
357
Remaining Problems for Teaching
358
Teaching the Whole Class
361
Elements of Teaching in Understanding Variations in Achievement
363
Looking with a Wider Lens at Teaching to Differences
367
Figuring out What to Teach in March and Whom to Teach It To
371
Skills and Understanding at the WholeClass Level
387
Teaching Closure
389
Providing an Opportunity for Students to Demonstrate Acquired Knowledge and Skill in a Conceptual Field
391
Providing an Opportunity for Students to Demonstrate What Has Been Learned About Studying Mathematics
406
Celebration Coda Reprise and Farewell
412
Teaching to Bring Closure to the Year
420
An Elaborated Model of Teaching Practice
423
The Problems of Teaching over Time in a Whole Class
424
The Complexities of Content in Teaching with Problems
431
The Complexities of Teachers and Students as Actors in the Work of Teaching
441
Navigating in the Complicated Terrain of Teaching with Problems
446
Complete Transcript of Large Group Discussion on September 28
449
Lesson Topics in a Sample of Lessons in Different Problem Contexts Across the Year
465
Functions and Graphing Quiz
471
Notes
473
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Magdalene Lampert is professor of educational studies, School of Education, University of Michigan.

Bibliographic information