A Thousand Days in the Arctic, Volume 1

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Harper & Brothers, 1899 - Franz Josef Land - 940 pages
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Narrative of Jackson-Harmsworth expedition to Zemlya Frants-Iosifa on the Windward, 1894-97. Includes appendices on scientific results of the expedition.
 

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Contents

We Discover New Land
471
IN VESEY HAMILTON CHANNEL
476
At Cape Flora
487
SNOWBUNTING HENLITTLE AUKSNOWBUNTING COCK
493
A Man on the Ice
507
THE MEETING BETWEEN JACKSON AND NANSEN
509
NANSEN AFTER HIS WASH AND BRUSHUP
514
THE CAIRN ON THE SUMMIT OF CAPE FLORA AND DR KOETTLITZ
526
SUMMER IN FRANZJOSEF LAND
533
AND PROCEEDED TO SLEDGE THEM ACROSS THE NOW VERY ROTTEN LAND
539
The Darkness of a Third Winter is Upon Us
544
LOOMS ON THE ROCKS
545
hxd stopped his farther advances with a bullet in the head
551
dredging in our whaleboat for marine life
557
our coalsacks
571
the scene outside the hut is desolate and dreary in
583
We Prepare again for Sledging
593
FRAMEWORK OF CANVAS CANOE BY MOONLIGHT
594
THE END OF THE HUNT
603
Queen Victoria Sea and the Northwest
617
THE GOING IS EXCESSIVELY BAD THROUGH BROKEN CRUSHEDUP ICE
623
THE BRITISH CHANNEL AND ALBERT ARMITAGE ISLAND
633
A CAMP ON THE SHORES OF THE QUEEN VICTORIA SEA
644
DEADPONY CAMP
651
CHAPTER PAGE
658
SKIRTING THE GLACIER FACE
675
ON THE PEARY GLACIER
684
A GROOVED BERG OFF CAPE FLORA
699
Unexpected Return of the Expedition
741
No Gillis Land
757
Home Again
770
APPENDIX
787
Notes on the Birds of FranzJosef Land
795
Botany of FranzJosef Land
807
Some Results of Meteorological Observations made at Cape Flora
818
Remarks etc
831
Journal of Aurora
844
Short Statement upon the Geology of FranzJosef Land
863
Absolute Declinations at Cape Flora
908
Report on the Flora of Franz Josef Land from Cape Barents
914
Synopsis of Wind Forces
920
Index
927
Copyright

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Page 880 - Price 10 cents. 65. Stratigraphy of the Bituminous Coal Field of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, by Israel C. White. 1891. 8". 212pp. 11 pi. Price 20 cents. 66. On a Group of Volcanic Rocks from the Tewan Mountains, New Mexico, and on the occurrence of Primary Quartz in certain Basalts, by Joseph Paxson Iddings.
Page 904 - Macrocephalus beds in Franz Josef Land, in association with plant-bearing strata, is of special interest. It extends the range of this ammonite several degrees towards the north, and shows, in all probability, that during the period of its existence a coast-line lay somewhere in this direction. Marine deposits of Callovian and Oxfordian age are now known to range from Sutherland to Cutch, and from Franz Josef Land to the nortli of Africa, and Ammonites Macrocephalus is one of the most widely distributed...
Page 904 - Hydroeratie and geocratic movements alternated during Jurassic times, with a decided balance in favour of the former, and a recession of the coast-line towards the north. Even in the North of Scotland we find no decided evidence of the proximity of land during the Oxfordian period, although the lower portions of the Jurassic formation are represented by littoral and estuarine deposits.* Under these circumstances the discovery of A.
Page 880 - ... being Surtsey, in 1973, fortunately with no loss of life despite great destruction of villages and the fishing industry. Iceland had an immense fissure flow of lava from Laki, in 1783, through cracks in the earth's crust. Fissure flows were responsible for sheets of old lava in the terraced hills of the Faroe Islands, the west of Scotland, and the north of Ireland. The Azores are a volcanic archipelago, as are the Canaries, the Cape Verde Islands, Ascension, St. Helena, and Tristan da Cunha....
Page 300 - Harmsworth and the lady whose name she bears,' and coupled Armitage's name with it. His nautical knowledge and experience had been of the utmost service to us. All my fellows have behaved extremely well, and if we had gone to the bottom, would have done so as becomes men. '' We found all our spare clothes soaked, and all our property dripping with water. The get-up of some of our party after attempting to change was most ludicrous. One appeared without breeches, but with a very damp blanket wrapped...
Page 874 - Renard, the above assumption is not warranted. Alkalies may have been added, and lime and magnesia removed. There is. however, no reason to believe that the relative amounts of alumina and iron have been appreciably changed, and we are therefore able to draw the important conclusion that in a magma of the type to which these basalts belongthat is, a basic magma poor in alkalies — progressive crystallization leads to the formation of a mother-liquor poor in silica and alumina and rich in iron.
Page 872 - It is a soft black or greenish-black substance, •which can be readily scratched with the finger-nail and cut with a knife. The powder has a soft unctuous feel when rubbed between the fingers. Heated in a closed tube it gives off a large amount of water. It is readily acted upon by hydrochloric acid, and fragments leave behind a white siliceous pseudomorph. Under the microscope, in very thin sections, it is usually seen to be of a deep brown colour; but occasionally it contains green zones arranged...
Page 904 - ... the north, and shows, in all probability, that during the period of its existence a coast-line lay somewhere in this direction. Marine deposits of Callovian and Oxfordian age are now known to range from Sutherland to Cutch and from Franz Josef Land to the North of Africa ; and A. maerocepkalus is one of the most widely distributed of all Jurassic ammonites.
Page 866 - On the slope of this hill a good deal of petrified wood was collected, and some other fossils.' It is further stated that ' the lowest rocks belong to the Oxford Clay, and are represented in the collection brought home in the Eira by two belemnites. Above the Oxford Clay the rock is of the Cretaceous period to which the fossil coniferous wood belongs, including one very perfect cone. There are also slabs with impressions of plants. Over all...
Page xxv - ... suggested by Payer's impression that there was land still further to the north in and beyond the eighty-third degree, and land to the northwest reaching almost as far, and it was on Payer's observations that Mr. Jackson formulated his plans in the latter end of 1892. Unfortunately his expectations were fated to disappointment by the non-extension of the land to the north. His plans embraced not only an advance in a northerly direction, but the mapping-in of the coast-lines of Franz Josef Land,...

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