The Greatest Thing in the World

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J. Pott & Company, 1890 - Bible - 64 pages
 

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A must-read for every Christian!

User Review  - Woody601 - Christianbook.com

I read this book for the first time, and wonder why it isn't a required reading for every Christian! D.L. Moody asked that this book be read at every Moody graduation... that's how important he ... Read full review

Excellent, thorough insight into 1 Cointhians 13

User Review  - Norma Steven - Christianbook.com

Henry Drummond's emphasis on the importance of love is summed up for me on page 53 of this little book: "The final test of religion at that great Day is not religiousness, but Love; not what I have ... Read full review

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Page 6 - Love suffereth long, and is kind; Love envieth not, Love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Doth not behave itself unseemly, Seeketh not its own, Is not provoked, Taketh not account of evil, Rejoiceth not in unrighteousness, But rejoiceth with the truth, Beareth all things, Believeth all things, Hopeth all things, Endureth all things.
Page 8 - When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things. For now we see through a glass darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.
Page 34 - For John came unto you in the way of righteousness, and ye believed him not ; but the publicans and the harlots believed him: and ye, when ye had seen it, repented not afterward, that ye might believe him.
Page 8 - ... beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Love never faileth: but whether there be prophecies, they shall fail; whether there be tongues, they shall cease; whether there be knowledge, it shall vanish away. For we know in part, and we prophesy in part. But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away.
Page 63 - ... spirit of Christ, the proof that we never knew Him, that for us He lived in vain. It means that He suggested nothing in all our thoughts, that He inspired nothing in all our lives, that we were not once near enough to Him to be seized with the spell of His compassion for the world. It means that — "I lived for myself, I thought for myself," For myself, and none beside — Just as if Jesus had never lived, As if He had never died.
Page 59 - Love suffereth long, and is kind; love envieth not; love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth; Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Love never faileth...
Page 60 - You will find as you look back upon your life that the moments that stand out, the moments when you have really lived, are the moments when you have done things in a spirit of love.
Page 43 - Talent develops itself in solitude; character in the stream of life." Talent develops itself in solitude — the talent of prayer, of faith, of meditation, of seeing the unseen ; Character grows in the stream of the world's life. That chiefly is where men are to learn love. How ? Now, how ? To make it easier, I have named a few of the elements of love. But these are only elements. Love itself can never be defined. Light is a something more than the sum of its ingredients — a glowing, dazzling,...
Page 14 - Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not love, I am become as sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal.
Page 32 - ... touchy" disposition. This compatibility of ill temper with high moral character is one of the strangest and saddest problems of ethics. The truth is there are two great classes of sins — sins of the Body, and sins of the Disposition. The Prodigal Son may be taken as a type of the first, the Elder Brother of the second. Now, society has no doubt whatever as to which of these is the worse. Its brand falls, without a challenge, upon the Prodigal. But are we right? We have no balance to weigh one...

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