Recent Social Trends in the United States, 1960-1990

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1994 - Social Science - 608 pages
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Many of the trends reflect the vigorous continuation of what Tocqueville called "the gradual progress of equality." Much of this progress resulted from successful government programs to reduce social inequality. These same programs expanded the role of government as the initiator and manager of social change. The enlargement of government functions that began in the 1960s and continues to this day, together with corporate and organizational consolidation in the private sector, changed the United States from a decentralized to a highly centralized nation. The transition has been uncomfortable, partly because centralization is not wholly compatible with other democratic values, and partly because American political institutions were originally designed to thwart centralization. This volume documents the trends involved in this transformation.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Age Groups
32
Microsocial
42
Women
82
Labor Market
137
Labor and Management
156
Social Stratification
168
Social Relations
201
InstitutionaUzation of Social Forces
321
Ideologies
336
Household Resources
381
Lifestyle
393
Leisure
454
Educational Attainment
472
Integration and Marginalization
490
Attitudes and Values
527

State and Service Institutions
238
Mobilizing Institutions
275
Appendix A International Research Group
566
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About the author (1994)

Theodore Caplow is Commonwealth Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Systems of War and Peace, American Social Trends, and Peace Games.

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