Records of the burgh of Prestwick, mcccclxx-mdcclxxxii [ed. by J. Fullarton].

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1834
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Page xxi - ... open hearth, or fireplace, in the middle ; the dunghill at the door ; the cattle starving, and the people wretched. The few ditches which existed were ill constructed, and the hedges worse preserved. The land overrun with weeds and rushes, gathered into very high, broad, serpentine ridges, interrupted with large balks, such as still disgrace the agriculture of some English counties.
Page vi - JAMES MAIDMENT, ESQ. THOMAS MAITLAND, ESQ. WILLIAM MEIKLEHAM, ESQ. WILLIAM HENRY MILLER, ESQ. WILLIAM MOTHERWELL, ESQ. 45 WILLIAM MURE, ESQ. ALEXANDER OSWALD, ESQ. JOHN MACMICHAN PAGAN, ESQ., MD WILLIAM PATRICK, ESQ.
Page xxii - One-half of the crop went to the landlord ; and the other remained with the tenant, to maintain his family and to cultivate his farm. The tenants were harassed with a multitude of vexatious servitudes ; such as ploughing and leading for the landlord, working his hay, and other operations ; which, from the nature of them, unavoidably interfered with the attention necessary on the tenant's own farm. These are now almost entirely abolished.
Page v - THE EARL OF GLASGOW, [PRESIDENT.] HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF SUSSEX. ROBERT ADAM, ESQ. JOHN BAIN, ESQ.
Page xxiv - Every farmer sowed a sufficiency of flax to em* ploy the women of his family at leisure hours. A small portion of hemp was likewise planted to make sacks and other coarse materials needed on the farm ; and a quantity of wool was either bought or reared for the purpose of spinning woollen stuffs to clothe the family. These, as well as the linen, were usually worked by some weaver in the neighbourhood, and supplied the dress of both sexes. The stalks of hemp were substituted in the place of candles...
Page xxii - The ground was scourged with a succession of oats after oats, as long as they would pay for seed and labour, and afford a small surplus of oatmeal for the family ; and then remained in a state of absolute sterility, or over.run with thistles, till rest enabled it again to reproduce a scanty crop. The arable farms were generally small, because the tenants had not stock for larger occupations.
Page xxii - It was often run-rigged or mixed property ; and two or three farmers usually lived in the same place, and had their different distributions of the farm in various proportions from 10 to 40, 60, or 100 acres. Many of these leases were granted for three 19 years. The rent was frequently paid In kind, or in what was called...
Page xxv - ... the county of Ayr and other provinces adjacent to the lowest gradation of want ; obliging hundreds of families to fly for subsistence to the north of Ireland, where their descendants still remain.
Page vii - ESQ. [SECRETARY.] 60 WILLIAM SMITH, ESQ. GEORGE SMYTHE, ESQ. MOSES STEVEN, ESQ. DUNCAN STEWART, ESQ. SYLVESTER DOUGLAS STIRLING, ESQ. 65 JOHN STRANG, ESQ. THOMAS THOMSON, ESQ. PATRICK FRASER TYTLER, ESQ. ADAM URQUHART, ESQ. SIR PATRICK WALKER, KNIGHT. 70 WILSON DOBIE WILSON, ESQ.
Page xxiii - ... with bigg or four.rowed barley. It then remained a year in lay ; and was broke up the following season to undergo the same rotation. — As to the out.field land, it remained in a state of absolute reprobation. No dung was ever spread on any part of it. The starved cattle kept on the farm, weie suffered to poach the fields, from the end of Harvest, till the ensuing seedtime...

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