Lean Software Strategies: Proven Techniques for Managers and Developers

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CRC Press, May 27, 2005 - Business & Economics - 468 pages
Winner Of The 2007 Shingo Prize For Excellence In Manufacturing Research!

Lean production, which has radically benefited traditional manufacturing, can greatly improve the software industry with similar methods and results. This transformation is possible because the same overarching principles that apply in other industries work equally well in software development. The software industry follows the same industrial concepts of production as those applied in manufacturing; however, the software industry perceives itself as being fundamentally different and has largely ignored what other industries have gained through the application of lean techniques.

Lean Software Strategies: Proven Techniques for Managers and Developers, shows how the most advanced concepts of lean production can be applied to software development and how current software development practices are inadequate.

Written for software engineers, developers, and leaders who need help creating lean software processes and executing genuinely lean projects, this book draws on the personal experiences of the two authors as well as research on various software companies applying lean production to software development programs.

 

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Peter and James have done a very good job. Mapping of Lean and Agile practices is well done. Good book to ready in my opinion.

Contents

Understanding Earlier Production Systems
9
Is Mass Production Suited to Software?
16
Identifying What Really Matters to the Customer
23
Eliminating Discontinuities in the Value Stream
33
Retaining Integrity via Jidoka and PokaYoke
41
Determining Softwares Industrial Paradigm
49
How a Lean DomainReuse Project Redefined the Reuse Model
55
Determining Softwares Industrial Paradigm
61
Integrating Production and the Project
240
Reducing the Cost of RequirementsBased Testing
246
Reducing Variance
252
C++ Ada SPARK Java
259
Perl TCL Python PHP
266
FlowApplying Industrial Insights
277
FlowThrough Stage Transitions
291
MetaSpecification and MetaDesign with XML
299

Comparing the CMM to Lean Principles
69
Determining Softwares Industrial Paradigm
81
XP Aligns with Craft and Lean
82
The Way Out of the Software Crisis
89
Building Lean SoftwareCustomer Space Early Lifecycle
97
Using Value Resolution in Lean Product Development
103
Choosing the Right Project
109
The Customer Home Turf
120
Concluding Thoughts
135
What a Specific Customer Knows It Wants
149
ValuesWhen Customers Dont Know What They Want
155
Predicting How Customers Will React
165
Planning Implementation
177
Defining Build Scope the XP Way
191
The Value StreamDesign
197
QFD
215
The Value StreamProduction
221
The Material Branch
228
The Information Branch
234
Pull and Perfection
309
The Ultimate Goal
316
Is Microsofts Build and Synchronise Process Lean?
325
Conclusion
333
Conclusion
341
Conclusion
347
SPL Accomplishments
363
Using Lean Principles and XP Practices
365
Lean Principles
371
Change Management
378
Removing the Roadblocks to Lean
386
Prognosis for Improvement in the Software Industry
393
The LM Aero 382J MC OFP Software Product Family
395
Software Analysis
401
Implementation Integration Verification and Conclusions
407
Index
415
About the Authors
432
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Peter Middleton is a senior lecturer in computer science at Queen's University in Belfast, Northern Ireland. His research interests are software quality, lean software development, and how to successfully implement change. He received his PhD in computer science from Imperial College, London and an MBA from the University of Ulster. Before joining Queen's University, he worked in industry for 10 years, with 5 years as an information systems manager. He can be contacted on p.middleton@qub.ac.uk. James Sutton is on senior staff at Lockheed Martin Aerospace and applies many of the lean strategies in this book to company and corporate projects. He recently advised the U.K. agency updating the London Air Traffic Control System software on how to meet competing integrity, cost, schedule, and political goals; most suggestions were adopted. He created lean software lifecycles as lead software and technical-processes architect for information-processing software for the C-5B, and central flight software for the 382J aircraft. Both projects doubled productivity and improved quality by an order of magnitude compared to industry norms. He has published numerous conference papers, been keynote and feature speaker at industry workshops, and in the 1980s, authored the software-engineering book Power Programming.

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