Citizen Tom Paine

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Grove Press, 1983 - Biography & Autobiography - 341 pages
13 Reviews
Among Howard Fast's historical fiction, Citizen Tom Paine-one of America's all-time best-sellers-occupies a special place, for it restored to a generation of readers the vision of Paine's revolutionary passion as the authentic roots of our national beginnings. Fast gives us "a vivid picture of Paine's mode of writing, idiosyncrasies, and character-generous, nobly unselfish, moody, often dirty, frequently drunken, a revolutionist by avocation"-Library Journal
 

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Review: Citizen Tom Paine

User Review  - Goodreads

Evocative, enlightening, exceptional. Read full review

Review: Citizen Tom Paine

User Review  - Goodreads

My interest was maintained throughout the whole book. Read full review

Contents

MY NAME IS PAINE
3
AMERICA IS THE PROMISED LAND
10
THE RAT TRAP
26
THE NINETEENTH OF APRIL AND SEVENTYFIVE
36
THE MAKING OF A REVOLUTIONIST
55
HOW TOM PAINE WROTE A SMALL BOOK
78
COMMON SENSE
100
THE TIMES THAT TRIED MENS SOULS
114
THE LONG WAR
147
REVOLUTIONIST AT LARGE
182
EUROPE
213
GIVE ME SEVEN YEARS 815
215
THE REPUBLIC OF FRANCE to 13 REASON IN GOD AND MAN 873
273
NAPOLEON BONAPARTE
302
BUT NO MAN KNOWETH OF HIS SEPULCHRE
322
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About the author (1983)

Howard Fast was born on November 11, 1914 in Manhattan. At the age of 17, he sold his first story to Amazing Stories magazine. The next year he sold his first novel, Two Villages, to the Dial Press for a $100 advance. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 80 books, including Conceived in Liberty, The Unvanquished, Citizen Tom Paine, Freedom Road, April Morning, The Immigrants, Second Generation, The Establishment, The Legacy, and Greenwich. He won the Stalin International Peace Prize in 1953. A member of the Communist party, he served three months in a federal prison in 1950 for refusing to testify about his political activity. Blacklisted as a result, he founded his own publishing house, Blue Heron Press, which released his novel Spartacus in 1951. In 1957, he wrote a book about his political experiences entitled The Naked God. He also wrote a series of detective stories under the name E. V. Cunningham. He died on March 12, 2003 at the age of 88.

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