Ancient Christian Magic: Coptic Texts of Ritual Power

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1999 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 409 pages
This provocative collection of rites, spells, amulets, curses, and recipes of the early Coptic Christians documents Christianity as a living folk religion resembling other popular belief systems - something quite different from what theo-logical and doctrinal traditions have led us to believe. Like The Nag Hammadi Library, this extraordinary collection of little known incantatory texts radically alters our perception of Christianity as primarily a highly theological and orthodox tradition. These texts and illustrations show that the folk practices of the earliest Christians are quite similar to the day-to-day beliefs and rituals of spirituality that imbue indigenous primal religions and popular religion generally. Placing these previously unknown ancient texts in historical context and explaining their significance, Marvin Meyer and Richard Smith also reveal the place of healing, prayer, miracles, and magic in the Christian teaching practice. Illustrated with line drawings and photographs from the original ancient documents and containing a plethora of rituals, curses, and spells, Ancient Christian Magic is the practical and liturgical companion to the narrative and theological texts of The Nag Hammadi Library.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Strider66 - LibraryThing

Pros: good introductions to each section, lots of explanatory notes, variety of texts Cons: only has a few pictures in instances when illustrations are present in the text Ritual has long been a part ... Read full review

ANCIENT CHRISTIAN MAGIC: Coptic Texts of Ritual Power

User Review  - Kirkus

Meyer (The Secret Teachings of Jesus, 1984) and Smith (The Nag Hamadi Library, not reviewed) provide literate and entertaining translations of a variety of early Christian magical incantations. For ... Read full review

Contents

IV
13
VII
21
IX
22
X
23
XI
27
XIII
31
XIV
32
XVI
33
LXXXIX
166
XC
169
XCI
171
XCII
175
XCIII
176
XCIV
177
XCV
178
XCVI
179

XVII
34
XVIII
35
XIX
37
XXI
38
XXIII
39
XXIV
40
XXV
41
XXVI
42
XXVII
43
XXVIII
44
XXIX
45
XXX
46
XXXI
47
XXXII
48
XXXIV
49
XXXV
50
XXXVI
51
XXXVIII
55
XXXIX
56
XL
59
XLIII
63
XLIV
66
XLV
68
XLVI
70
XLVII
73
XLVIII
77
XLIX
79
L
83
LI
90
LII
91
LIII
92
LIV
94
LV
95
LVI
97
LVII
98
LVIII
99
LIX
100
LX
101
LXII
102
LXIII
103
LXIV
104
LXV
105
LXVII
110
LXVIII
112
LXIX
113
LXX
115
LXXI
117
LXXII
120
LXXIII
125
LXXV
127
LXXVI
128
LXXVII
129
LXXIX
133
LXXX
147
LXXXII
152
LXXXIII
153
LXXXIV
158
LXXXV
159
LXXXVI
160
LXXXVII
161
LXXXVIII
164
XCVII
181
XCVIII
183
C
187
CI
188
CII
190
CIII
192
CIV
194
CV
196
CVI
197
CVII
199
CVIII
202
CIX
203
CX
204
CXI
206
CXIII
207
CXIV
209
CXV
210
CXVI
211
CXVII
212
CXVIII
215
CXIX
216
CXX
217
CXXI
218
CXXII
222
CXXIII
224
CXXIV
225
CXXV
227
CXXVII
228
CXXVIII
230
CXXIX
231
CXXX
232
CXXXI
233
CXXXII
237
CXXXIII
239
CXXXIV
243
CXXXV
244
CXXXVI
246
CXXXVII
248
CXXXVIII
250
CXXXIX
251
CXLI
257
CXLII
259
CXLV
263
CXLVI
270
CXLVII
275
CXLVIII
279
CL
281
CLI
283
CLII
293
CLV
304
CLVI
311
CLVII
314
CLVIII
323
CLIX
343
CLX
345
CLXI
359
CLXII
389
CLXIII
395
CLXIV
397
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About the author (1999)

Marvin W. Meyer is Professor of Religion at Chapman University and director of the Coptic Magical Texts Project of the Institute for Antiquity and Christianity. Richard Smith teaches at Claremont Graduate School and was managing editor of The Nag Hammadi Library (revised edition).

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