The Nationalist Revolution in China, 1923-1928

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 29, 1984 - History - 232 pages
This lively history of China's Nationalist revolution tells the story of a small group of Chinese patriots headed by Sun Yat-sen until his death in 1925. They mobilised men, money, and propaganda to create a provincial base from which they launched a revolutionary military campaign to unify the country, end imperialist privilege, and bring the Kuomintang to power. Soviet Russia induced the fledgling Chinese Communist Party to join the effort, and sent money, arms, military and political experts to guide the revolution. But there was a fatal flaw in this co-operation, and when the fighting was over, the remnant Communist Party had been driven underground, the Russian experts had been expelled, and a faction-riven Nationalist Party led by Chiang Kai-shek could claim to be China's new government. This study of a key period in China's history, reprinted from Volume 12 of The Cambridge History of China, is solidly based in Chinese, Russian, and Western languages sources.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Kwangtung and Kwangsi in the early 1920s
26
Competition and dissension within
27
The drive to unify China first phase
49
Hunan and Kiangsi during the Northern Expedition
56
Conflict over revolutionary goals
77
The Lower Yangtze region 89
104
Mounting problems for the Wuhan regime
113
The communists turn to rebellion
147
The final drive Peking captured and Nanking the new capital
170
Bibliographical essay
195
Index
214
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information