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Phosphorus, duration of action, of long duration; time not

definitely ascertained. Phosphoric Acid, "" of long duration; time not

definitely ascertained. Platina, "" from three to six weeks.

Plumbum, "" colicky from one to ten

days, paralysis weeks and montns.

Pulsatilla,

Ranunculus,

Rheum,

Rhus-radicans,

Rhus-toxicodendron,

Ruta,

Sabadilla,

weeks. Sabina,

weeks. Sambucus,

days. Sanguinaria, Sarsaparilla,

diseases. Soillae,

hours. Secale Cornu,

weeks. Sepia, Silicea,

that of Calcarea. Spigelia,

rasus and Digitalis. Spongia,

Stannum, ,

fully known Staphysagra, Stramonium, Sulphur,

three weeks. Sulphuric Acid,

duration of action from one to ten days.

from twenty to forty days,
from one to ten days,
from five to seven weeks
from one to three weeks,
not definitely ascertained

from six or eight hours to

from six or eight hours to

from one to eight or ten

from six to forty-eight hours, a long time in chronic

from three to forty-eight

from two or three hours to

of long duration similar to

similar to that of Lauroce

similar to that of Iodine,
of long duration; time not

from thirty to forty days, from six days to two and

from two to ten days in

strains; much longer in Chronic diseases.

Tartar Emetic,

night. Tabacum, Thuja, Teucrium,

Urtica Urens, in burns.

Veratrum,

eight days.

duration of action from two hours to a fort

"«* from one day to thirty.
*« " not definitely ascertained.
•« " from two to nine days.

"11 from one hour to a week,
■« " from one hour to six or

AN ABRIDGED LIST OF REMEDIES,

FORMING A CONVENIENT POCKET CASE, OR A CASE FOR DOMESTIC USE, AND WELL ADAPTED TO THIS WORK.

Aconite.

Antimony.

Arnica.

Belladonna.

Bryonia Alba.

Calcarea Carb.

Camphora.

Cantharides.

Capsicum.

Carbo Veg.

Causticum.

Chamomilla.

China or Cinchona

Cina.

Cocculus.

Coffea.

Colocynth.

Drosera.

Dulcamara.

Euphrasia.

Ferrum.

Graphites.

Hepar-sulphur.

Hyosciamus.

Ignatia.

Ipecacuanha.

Kali Carb.

Lachesis.

Mercurius.

Nux-Vomica.

Opium.

Phosphorus.

Pulsatilla.

Rhus-toxicodendron.

Sambucus.

Sepia.

Silicea.

Spigelia.

Spongia.

Staphysagra

Sulphur.

Thuja.

Urtica Urens.
Veratrum.

ATTENUATION OR STRENGTH OP DRUGS.

It will be perceived that I have carefully avoided (with but few exceptions) laying down any definite rule in regard to the strength and dose of the different remedies employed or recommended in this work. My reasons for this must be obvious, to the intelligent physician at least. Although much has been written upon the subject, it remains far from being a settled question; while some of our best practitioners use principally the lower attenuations, others of equal repute choose the higher. A due respect to the opinions of both (many of whom have contributed largely to the fund of medical science) would, in the absence of a proper regard for the predilections of other friends to Homoeopathy, forbid the adoption of a fixed rule, even though I thought it possible, which however I do not. For not only age, temperament, predisposition, idiosyncrasy, sex, character of the disease, (whether it be acute or chronic, organic and of the more delicate structure, or of the ligaments and the general aponeurotic tissue,) but also the character of the drug to be employed, should be taken into consideration, and necessarily must influence the dose to a greater or less extent. We see it further exemplified in remedying mechanical and antidoting chemical diseases.

Taking the above as a guide, I cannot confine myself to any particular attenuation or strength of drug, but must adapt the remedies to the exigencies of the case under the conditions above expressed ; using the higher attenuations in organic disease, with children and females; children and females being more susceptible from their delicacy of organization; and employing the lower attenuations in rheumatic affections, diseases of the skin, and with those about middle-aged, as their " resisting power against morbific agencies and medicinal impressions are the greatest.' DOSE AND FORM OF MEDICINE.

As some prefer pellets, some tinctures, and others triturations, it may be of use to lay down a general rule governing the administration of each form of drug. When pellets are used, one or two may be placed on the tongue and allowed to dissolve, followed by a draught of water; or five or six may be dissolved in a tumbler half full of pure cold water, well stirred, and a tea-spoon full given at a dose. When tinctures are used, drop from one to three or four drops in a tumbler, partially filled (say a half or two-thirds) with pure cold water, stir it well and give from a tea-spoon full, to a table-spoon full at a dose, as the case may seem to require, whether the patient be a child or an adult. When triturations (powders) are used, give as much as will lay on the point of a penknife blade, either dry on the tongue, or dissolved in water similar to the pillets.

I have generally given the repetition or frequency of dose in each form of disease; more as a general guide to the patient than as a dictation to the physician, who it is presumed, will act upon his own judgment in this respect, based upon his knowledge of the character and location of the disease, and the duration of action of the remedy employed. But it is not to be supposed that he can remem

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