The Medieval Medea

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Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 267 pages
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The legends of Jason and Medea illustrate how disparate and sometimes contradictory stories were combined in the creation of the first secular princely quest, how that quest functioned as a benchmark of western chronology, and how that in turn assured the stories' position as part of the legends of Troy. The innovations of Euripides and Apollonius were imitated throughout Antiquity, and examples of murderous mothers illustrated the lethal disruptions of which women could be capable. For many medieval authors -- Dante, Chaucer, Boccaccio, Gower, Christine de Pizan and others --the problem of a hero who betrays his oath and a heroine who murders and escapes offered insoluble and tragic subjects. This study discusses how the legends contribute not only to ideas of history, but also to conceptions of the power and ruthlessness of women.RUTH MORSE is Professeur des UniversitÚs at UniversitÚParis VII.
 

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Contents

One Medeas of Antiquity
19
Two The History of Jason
59
Three Medea sparagmos
103
Four The Romance of Jason
148
BNf MS f fr 331 fol
176
BNf MS f fr 331 fol 132
176
Arsenal MS 5067 fol 130
176
BNf MS f fr 12570 fol 154v
176
Arsenal MS 5067 fol 117v
176
BNf MS f fr 331 fol 139v Plate 7 City of Anger Apocalypse Tapestry
176
Five Some Medieval Medeas
185
Silence Exile and Cunning Intelligence
237
Index
265
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