Water Distribution in Ancient Rome: The Evidence of Frontinus

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University of Michigan Press, 1997 - Social Science - 168 pages
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Water Distribution in Ancient Rome examines the nature and effects of Rome's system of aqueducts, drawing on the difficult but important work of the Roman engineer Frontinus. Among other questions, the volume considers how water traveled to the many neighborhoods of hilly Rome, which neighborhoods were connected to the water system, and how those connections were made. A consideration of Frontinus' writing reveals comprehensive planning by city officials over long periods of time and the difficulties these engineering feats posed. Water Distribution in Ancient Rome is essential reading for students and scholars of Frontinus, of Roman engineering and imperial policy, and of Roman topography and archaeology.
"Clear style, good maps and photographs, notes, and bibliography make this work accessible and valuable for students at every level. An admirable contribution to knowledge of the Roman Empire." --Choice
Harry B. Evans is Professor of Classics, Fordham University. He is a recipient of the Rome Prize and is past Secretary-Treasurer of the American Philological Association.
This book was published with the assistance of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
 

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Contents

Sextus Julius Frontinus On the Water Supply of the City of Rome
13
Frontinus Rule and Guide
53
The Aqua Appia
65
The Aqua Anio Vetus
75
The Aqua Marcia
83
The Aqua Tepula
95
The Aqua Julia
99
The Aqua Virgo
105
The Aqua ClaudiaAnio Novus and Arcus Caelimontani
115
Aqueducts after Frontinus The Aqua Traiana and Aqua Alexandriana
129
Conclusions
135
Works Cited
149
Index Locorum
155
Index
161
Plates
Copyright

The Aqua Alsietina
111

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Page 7 - Morgan (1 914) describes how the aqueduct castellum worked (as presented in Evans, 1994): When it (the water) has reached the city, build a reservoir with a distribution tank in three compartments connected with the reservoir to receive the water, and let the reservoir have three pipes, one for each of the connecting tanks, so that when the water runs over from the tanks at the ends, it may run into the one between them. From this central tank, pipes will be laid to all the basins and fountains;...
Page 7 - If, however, there are hills between the city and the source of supply, subterranean channels must be dug, and brought to a level at the gradient mentioned above. If the bed is of tufa or other stone, let the channel be cut in it; but if it is of earth or sand, there must be vaulted masonry walls...
Page 7 - ... city, build a reservoir with a distribution tank in three compartments connected with the reservoir to receive the water, and let the reservoir have three pipes, one for each of the connecting tanks, so that when the water runs over from the tanks at the ends, it may run into the one between them. 2. From this central tank, pipes will be laid to all the basins and fountains; from the second tank, to baths, so that they may yield an annual income to the state; and from the third, to private houses,...

About the author (1997)

Harry B. Evans is Professor of Classics, Fordham University. He is a recipient of the Rome Prize and is past Secretary-Treasurer of the American Philological Association.

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