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Lawrence Lessig, 2006 - Law - 410 pages
3 Reviews
There’s a common belief that cyberspace cannot be regulated-that it is, in its very essence, immune from the government’s (or anyone else’s) control.Code, first published in 2000, argues that this belief is wrong. It is not in the nature of cyberspace to be unregulab≤ cyberspace has no "nature.” It only has code-the software and hardware that make cyberspace what it is. That code can create a place of freedom-as the original architecture of the Net did-or a place of oppressive control. Under the influence of commerce, cyberspace is becoming a highly regulable space, where behavior is much more tightly controlled than in real space. But that’s not inevitable either. We can-we must-choose what kind of cyberspace we want and what freedoms we will guarantee. These choices are all about architecture: about what kind of code will govern cyberspace, and who will control it. In this realm, code is the most significant form of law, and it is up to lawyers, policymakers, and especially citizens to decide what values that code embodies. Since its original publication, this seminal book has earned the status of a minor classic. This second edition, or Version 2.0, has been prepared through the author’s wiki, a web site that allows readers to edit the text, making this the first reader-edited revision of a popular book.

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User Review  - tyroeternal - LibraryThing

Code is a great book on the regulation of cyberspace. There is no dancing around the point that it is a tedious read. Keeping my focus till the end was difficult, but it was worth finishing. Lessig ... Read full review

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User Review  - jaygheiser - LibraryThing

Brilliant book. Wonder what an update would look like. Important concept on how risk can be reduced, what controls does a system exert: Regulations, Norms, Architecture, and Market. This idea can be played out in lots of other contexts. Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Lawrence Lessig is a professor at Stanford Law School and founder of the school's Center for the Internet and Society. After clerking for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and for Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court, he served on the faculties of the University of Chicago, Yale Law School, and Harvard Law School before moving to Stanford. He represented the web site developer Eric Eldred before the Supreme Court in Ashcroft v. Eldred, a landmark case challenging the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. His other books are Free Culture and The Future of Ideas. Lessig also chairs the Creative Commons project and serves on the board of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. In 2002 he was named one of Scientific American's Top 50 Visionaries. He lives in Palo Alto, California.

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